Ohio professor objects to preserving nuclear heritage sites like Oak Ridge

Ohio professor objects to preserving nuclear heritage sites like Oak Ridge

October 21, 2005

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) -- Next month, the National Park Service will launch a two-year study of sites around the nation where work was done on the Manhattan Project -- the top-secret effort to help produce the first atomic bomb.

The "secret city" of Oak Ridge in Tennessee was where uranium was enriched to make the bomb possible.

The government wants to determine if the bomb sites should be included in the park system, and that is sparking controversy.

Larry Gara is a professor emeritus of history at Wilmington College in Ohio. He says turning the bomb sites into national parks is a bad idea because the project started the age of nuclear terror.

Supporters say the parks would document an incredible technological achievement made under severe secrecy and time pressures.

Other sites include Los Alamos, New Mexico, where the first bombs were built, and four sites in Dayton, Ohio, where research was conducted.

Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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