Maryville pain clinic operators arrested

Maryville pain clinic operators arrested on drug, money laundering charges

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Investigators' vehicles were lined up outside the Breakthrough Pain Therapy Center. Investigators' vehicles were lined up outside the Breakthrough Pain Therapy Center.

By JILL MCNEAL
6 News Anchor/Reporter

MARYVILLE (WATE) - The operators and some workers at two Maryville pain clinics were arrested Tuesday in an alleged drug trafficking conspiracy worth millions of dollars.

Tamral Guzman, 40, of Maryville, is accused of operating Maryville Pain Management, LLC on Lamar Alexander Parkway.

Guzman is charged with conspiracy to distribute controlled substances, including oxycodone, conspiracy to commit money laundering, and structuring cash transactions to avoid federal currency transaction reporting requirements.

Brian Downey, 37, of Maryville, is charged with conspiracy to commit money laundering and the structuring offenses in the same indictment with Guzman.

The U.S. Attorney's Office says Sandra Kincaid, 59, her husband, Randy Kincaid, 55, and her daughter, Wendy Henry, 41, all of Maryville, were also arrested Tuesday.

Sandra Kincaid is accused of operating Breakthrough Pain Therapy Center, LLC, on East Broadway. She, her husband and daughter are charged with: conspiracy to distribute controlled substances including oxycodone.

The Kincaids are also charged with conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Randy Kincaid is charged with several counts of structuring cash transactions to avoid federal currency transaction reporting requirements.

"It's like a movie. It just doesn't feel real," said his stepson, Dustin Morgan.

Morgan has been an office assistant at Breakthrough Pain Therapy Center for the last year and a half, ever since his mother and stepfather opened the business.

"There are people that are terminally ill. You get to help them. They come in smiling and they know your name and it's wonderful. People come in all the time just wanting Mom and Randy to pray with them," Morgan said.

He was there when the clinic was raided and saw his parents led out in handcuffs, his mother crying.

"They just told us that they loved us," Morgan said.

He's convinced they did nothing wrong and only saw legitimate patients.

"We treat for chronic, long-term pain. If we don't believe it's chronic or long-term, we told them that we can't take them. We've got a file cabinet with probably over 200 or 300 patients that we've already dismissed because of doctor shopping, if they get hit with drug charges, because we don't want to have anything to do with it," Morgan said.

Amy Upton she came to the Breakthrough clinic for her monthly roxycodone prescription refill and was shocked to learn about the bust.

"I know people abuse the drugs and that people are selling their medicine, but it really hurts for people like me that are not trying to abuse medicine that actually need the medicine," Upton said.

She and other patients spoke highly of the owner. 

Morgan has faith. "We've got the Lord on our side, and I believe everything will be okay," he said.

Not everyone is sad to see the clinic shut down. Neighbors watched the raid from outside their homes.

"I don't like all that traffic around here. I've got kids. Especially with all those pill heads, you never know what's going to happen. So yeah, I'm glad," said neighbor Shane Batka.

The Maryville Pain indictment seeks a money judgment against Guzman of approximately $1.6 million. The Breakthrough indictment seeks a money judgment against the Kincaids and Henry of almost $1 million. The totals represent the amount of money alleged to be involved in the defendants' drug trafficking conspiracies.

A federal grand jury in Knoxville returned the multiple-count indictments in this case on December 7.

The indictments were unsealed Tuesday following a 13-month investigation by local and federal agencies including a Drug Enforcement Administration task force and the IRS.

The indictments also seek the forfeiture of real estate (including both clinics), vehicles and the contents of the defendants' and the clinics' bank accounts.

If convicted, each defendant faces a term of up to 20 years in prison. They also face fines of up to $1 million and criminal forfeiture.

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