Sevier County still has flooding with more rain on the way

Sevier County still has flooding with more rain on the way

Posted:
River Divide Road in Sevierville was still covered with water Thursday. River Divide Road in Sevierville was still covered with water Thursday.
But that didn't stop some drivers. But that didn't stop some drivers.
"We call it, this time of the year, we call it Walden's River, not Walden's Creek," said a nearby resident, Neil Hettingh. "We call it, this time of the year, we call it Walden's River, not Walden's Creek," said a nearby resident, Neil Hettingh.

By ERICA ESTEP
6 News Anchor/Reporter

SEVIERVILLE (WATE) - Some areas in Sevier County can't handle much more rain. The rivers and creeks throughout the county are still swollen from above average rainfall the last couple weeks.

Hours after flooding receded Thursday in most of Sevier County, River Divide Road in Sevierville was still covered with water.

It didn't stop drivers from taking the chance, and driving through the moving water. The Little Pigeon River was so swollen and swift, some ducks chose to swim in the street instead.

Walden's Creek in Wears Valley looked more like a river Thursday. "We call it, this time of the year, we call it Walden's River, not Walden's Creek," said a nearby resident, Neil Hettingh.

Hettingh has lived in the area more than a decade. He says residents are used to flooding. That's why he built a flood wall to protect his home.

"It will just go back in the horse pasture behind me and there will be water all the way from this house to the next house over there and it will feel like you're on a cruise because it's just a lot of water," he explained.

The creek had already spilled water into Hettingh's pasture and water was rising around his barn Thursday afternoon, with more rain expected throughout the evening.

Hettingh says when the creek gets really strong it's common to see car tires and large limbs roaring past, but the biggest problem is what happens after all the water goes down. "It's about a week's worth of cleanup," he said.

The rivers and creeks in the Gatlinburg area of Great Smoky Mountains National Park were also roaring Thursday afternoon and in the higher elevations, snow had begun to fall.

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