2 cited for cruelty to llama in Knox County

2 cited for cruelty to llama in Knox County

Posted:
The llama couldn't stand up when it was being kept on the Scates' property. The llama couldn't stand up when it was being kept on the Scates' property.
"Stamos" was named by the UT vet school students because they thought he looked like the actor John Stamos. "Stamos" was named by the UT vet school students because they thought he looked like the actor John Stamos.

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - A Knox County mother and son were cited with animal cruelty connected to a male llama that has since recovered and has a new owner.

Pearl Scates was cited for not providing any medical care for the llama. Her son, Gerald Scates received two citations, one for animal cruelty and one for manner of keeping.

Animal control officers were sent to the Scates' home at 9905 Coward Mill Road on August 21 after an unidentified caller complained about the llama's care.

The officers found the llama with a large cut on his upper and lower lips so that the lips were just hanging by a small piece of flesh. The sheriff's office says barb wire fence was wrapped around the animal.

A feed bowl had what apparently was rain water with bugs in it.

The llama couldn't stand up, and Pearl Scates told officers it had been lying down for the past two days. She said her son owned the llama, but was out of town, unable to be reached.

The officer asked if she had contacted a veterinarian to treat the llama. According to the sheriff's office, Scates said no, but she would call one to shoot it.

When the officer asked if she would sign ownership of the llama over to the sheriff's office, Scates did.

With the help of Horse Haven personnel and more animal control officers, the llama was loaded into a horse trailer and taken to the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine. 

Vets treated the llama and shaved him because his fur was so matted. Within a week he was standing again, his mouth healed after being stitched and he had a new name and owner. 

"Stamos" was named by the vet school students because they thought he looked like the actor John Stamos. His new owner is veterinarian Trish Harrop. Stamos will be released to her Tuesday afternoon.

Dr. Harrop and animal control officers were so touched by Stamos' condition they donated their own money to the vet school for his care.

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