Residents satisfied with TVA's plan for coal ash cleanup

Residents satisfied with TVA's plan for coal ash cleanup

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TVA announced they would allow natural river processes to finish clean up in the Emory and Clinch rivers leftover from the spill. TVA announced they would allow natural river processes to finish clean up in the Emory and Clinch rivers leftover from the spill.
"It was the best decision to be made, simply because of the disturbance that would have been created had TVA tried to dig up the coal ash, had it remained it in the river," resident Sarah McCoin said. "It was the best decision to be made, simply because of the disturbance that would have been created had TVA tried to dig up the coal ash, had it remained it in the river," resident Sarah McCoin said.
"Anytime you disrupt the national sediment of the river, it's questionable whether they can do it without causing more problems," said homeowner Don Simon. "Anytime you disrupt the national sediment of the river, it's questionable whether they can do it without causing more problems," said homeowner Don Simon.

By MIKE KRAFCIK
6 News Reporter

KINGSTON (WATE) - People living near the site of the ash spill at the Kingston fossil plant got their chance to discuss TVA's long-term plans on Thursday.

TVA officials met with those affected to get some input on their plan before moving forward.

On Wednesday, TVA announced they would allow natural river processes to finish clean up in the Emory and Clinch rivers leftover from the spill.

It's the least expensive plan and TVA said it is the least intrusive on the area.

Along Swan Pond Road in Kingston, the cleanup efforts are still happening nearly four years after the spill dumped billions of gallons of sludge into the community.

A large portion of the coal ash still remains in the rivers.

TVA's plan would manage the coal ash still dispersed throughout 200 acres of these waters. That's a best case scenario, according to Sarah McCoin, a nearby resident affected by the spill.

"It was the best decision to be made, simply because of the disturbance that would have been created had TVA tried to dig up the coal ash, had it remained it in the river," she said.

The plan would monitor the rivers for a 30-year period And cost $10 million dollars. It's also the cheapest solution of the three proposed.

Dregging the rest of the ash out would cost $180 million, which could be disruptive since left over materials from the Department of Energy still remain.

"It probably makes the most sense for the area, due to the fact that this river has been polluted in the past, and anytime you disrupt the national sediment of the river, it's questionable whether they can do it without causing more problems," said homeowner Don Simon.

Steve Scarborough, the head of the Roane County Advisory Group, said TVA should done more in the past.

"I understand why they're doing it. To me, they haven't exhausted what could be accomplished in cleaning up everything," he said.

Others like Roane County Commissioner Ron Ellis said ideally he'd like all the ash to be cleaned up, but said this is the best alternative.

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