Monroe County courthouse will not display the Ten Commandments

Monroe County courthouse will not display the Ten Commandments

Posted:
Monroe County Mayor Tim Yates released a lengthy press release detailing the reasons why the county will not be displaying the Ten Commandments anytime soon. Monroe County Mayor Tim Yates released a lengthy press release detailing the reasons why the county will not be displaying the Ten Commandments anytime soon.
"This is where we live and we, as Christians, should have a voice on what's posted in our courthouse and what's hanging up there because it makes a statement for us," said Bryce Carter, of Madisonville. "This is where we live and we, as Christians, should have a voice on what's posted in our courthouse and what's hanging up there because it makes a statement for us," said Bryce Carter, of Madisonville.
"If people want to live by the Ten Commandments, it doesn't matter if they're hanging in the courthouse or not. If you wanna live by the laws, it doesn't matter where it hangs," said Blake Wallace, of Madisonville. "If people want to live by the Ten Commandments, it doesn't matter if they're hanging in the courthouse or not. If you wanna live by the laws, it doesn't matter where it hangs," said Blake Wallace, of Madisonville.

By HAYLEY HARMON
6 News Anchor/Reporter

MADISONVILLE (WATE) - Plans to hang The Ten Commandments in the Monroe County Courthouse have been delayed once again.

In 2005, they were taken off the walls after a lawsuit was filed by the American Civil Liberties Union.

Then just a few months ago, Monroe County officials announced they would hang them back up, thanks to a new state law that says "historical documents" can be displayed.

But threats over further legal action have the county taking another look at its decision.

Preparations to hang The Ten Commandments again were already complete at the courthouse, in the very same spot where they were nearly seven years ago.

To comply with the state law, the county was going to hang them with four other historical documents.

But a group 6 News profiled earlier this month, the Freedom from Religion Foundation, threatened a lawsuit.

The county then looked into what might happen if they put the commandments back up and was sued.

Monroe County Mayor Tim Yates released a lengthy press release detailing three reasons why the county will not be displaying the Ten Commandments anytime soon.

The county attorney said first, Monroe County has a history of displaying the Commandments by themselves.

Second, because of that history, new historical documents will be judged with a skeptical eye. The court may ask, "What is the county really trying to do here?"

Third, recent public support will weigh against the county, because it has called for the Commandments, but not the historical documents as a whole.

Essentially, the county concluded winning a suit in court would be "very, very difficult."

Some locals are upset by the decision.

"We can't offend anybody, yet they don't consider us. We're offended that we can't display what we believe in - The Ten Commandments," said Bob Wendt, of Madisonville.

"This is where we live and we, as Christians, should have a voice on what's posted in our courthouse and what's hanging up there because it makes a statement for us," said Bryce Carter, of Madisonville.

Others said church and state should stay separate.

"If people want to live by the Ten Commandments, it doesn't matter if they're hanging in the courthouse or not. If you wanna live by the laws, it doesn't matter where it hangs," said Blake Wallace, of Madisonville.

Mayor Yates said in the press release that if it came to the county defending a lawsuit, they would have to use tax dollars to fight it, adding more burden to the local government.

That's something he doesn't want to have to do.

Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and WATE. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.