LMU law students get live law lesson from Fourth Circuit Court

LMU law students get live law lesson as Fourth Circuit Court moves to campus

Posted:
Judge Bill Swann brought his 4th Circuit courtroom to LMU to give students a live and in-person look at court proceedings in action. Judge Bill Swann brought his 4th Circuit courtroom to LMU to give students a live and in-person look at court proceedings in action.
Even though moving all those cases to an unfamiliar location may be difficult and it does cost the school extra money to staff additional security, Judge Bill Swann said the benefit to the students is invaluable. Even though moving all those cases to an unfamiliar location may be difficult and it does cost the school extra money to staff additional security, Judge Bill Swann said the benefit to the students is invaluable.
The clerks and the domestic violence community also had to relocate for the event. The clerks and the domestic violence community also had to relocate for the event.
Fourth year law student Kyle Vaughn said, "It opens it up to the entire student body for a chance to see what real life real lawyers do and what real judges do." Fourth year law student Kyle Vaughn said, "It opens it up to the entire student body for a chance to see what real life real lawyers do and what real judges do."

By DREW GARDNER
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - The halls of the Duncan School of Law at Lincoln Memorial University are usually filled with students and professors, but that wasn't the case Thursday morning.

"We will be operating 3 courtrooms with Judge Swann and two magistrates," said LMU Associate Dean for Academics April Meldrum.

This is the second time Judge Bill Swann has brought his 4th Circuit courtroom to LMU to give students a live and in-person look at court proceedings in action, and its no small task.

"The Sheriff, the clerk, all of the clerks, the domestic violence community have to travel here," said Judge Swann.  "They have to find new parking, have to learn to things to do. It's very hard."

"Today is the order of protection docket day," said Meldrum. "So this morning there are approximately 150 cases on the docket and we will have an afternoon docket as well."

Even though moving all those cases to an unfamiliar location may be difficult and it does cost the school extra money to staff additional security, the judge said the benefit to the students is invaluable.

"They say 'Gosh, I didn't realize what court was really like'," said Judge Swann.

LMU students seemed to agree and said normally the opportunity would only go to those who receive internships, which is a small percent.

Fourth year law student Kyle Vaughn said, "It opens it up to the entire student body for a chance to see what real life real lawyers do and what real judges do."

"It's an amazing opportunity to actually see the court system at work and to meet the needs of the people we hope to serve," added Meldrum.

It's an opportunity both Judge Swann and LMU hope to continue for many years to come.

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