Hancock County icy roads close school Monday

Hancock County icy roads close school Monday

Posted:
Denise Seal said her driveway was so icy, she hadn't been able to get out in a week. Denise Seal said her driveway was so icy, she hadn't been able to get out in a week.
Rhonda Hurd had to take a different route to the Hancock County Sheriff's Department where she works. Rhonda Hurd had to take a different route to the Hancock County Sheriff's Department where she works.
"The way we are situated in this county, you get so many hills and hollers, and places where the sun don't hit," explained Clem Seal, the county's roads superintendent. "You just have to take care of the worse places." "The way we are situated in this county, you get so many hills and hollers, and places where the sun don't hit," explained Clem Seal, the county's roads superintendent. "You just have to take care of the worse places."

By JOSH AULT
6 News Reporter

SNEEDVILLE (WATE) - Friday's ice storm seemed to pass quickly for most, but in Hancock County schools remained closed Monday.

School officials said too many roads were still too icy.

Denise Seal lives on Mullins Drive, one of the roads in Sneedville that is still very icy.

"They've been really bad," said Seal. "I haven't been able to get up and down my hill for over a week."

Another person who had a hard time getting out of her home was Rhonda Hurd. She had to take a different route to the Hancock County Sheriff's Department where she works.

"They still have snow from the week before last, plus the ice on top of that from Friday," said Hurd.

Both women say they were not surprised school was canceled again.

"No, I was really hoping," said Hurd. "I knew how bad they would be. I knew it would be dangerous for the schools buses."

The man in charge of getting these roads clear is Clem Seal, the county's road superintendent.

"The way we are situated in this county, you get so many hills and hollers, and places where the sun don't hit," explained Clem Seal. "You just have to take care of the worse places."

Since there are so many dirt roads in the county, they cannot use salt because it will just erode the dirt. All they can use is gravel chips.

"I'm running low right now," said Seal. "I'm going to have to find [some]. Everything we got is trucked in here."

The superintendent says they have five graders and three plow trucks. He wished he had more, but there budget just won't allow it.

The Hancock County Highway Department budget is just over a million dollars. They get no help from the county, and rely on a gas tax.

Clem Seal is confident Monday's warmer temperatures will make roads find for buses Tuesday, and he plans to get more gravel later this week. 

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