West Knox County road prone to excessive speeders

West Knox County road prone to excessive speeders

Posted:
6 News crews observed officers pull over nine motorists in about a 20 minute span, some of which were clocked at driving close to 70 miles per hour. 6 News crews observed officers pull over nine motorists in about a 20 minute span, some of which were clocked at driving close to 70 miles per hour.
Even though speed limit signs in most areas are clearly posted, excessive speeding continues to be a big problem on some Knox County roads, especially roads that have recently undergone a major makeover. Even though speed limit signs in most areas are clearly posted, excessive speeding continues to be a big problem on some Knox County roads, especially roads that have recently undergone a major makeover.

BY: BO WILLIAMS

6 News Anchor/Reporter

Even though speed limit signs in most areas are clearly posted, excessive speeding continues to be a big problem on some Knox County roads, especially roads that have recently undergone a major makeover.

According to Knox County Lt. Todd Clark, one road that has recently gone through construction is Hardin Valley in West Knoxville. "Hardin Valley is typical of a road that started out as a two lane road and then overtime becomes a four lane drag strip," said Clark.

This statement held true as 6 News crews observed officers pull over nine motorists in about a 20 minute span, some of which were clocked at driving close to 70 miles per hour.

"In this area (Hardin Valley Road), it is 45 miles per hour", says Lt. Clark, "but at any given moment on any given day you can come out and shoot radar and people will exceed 60 miles an hour, even exceed 65 miles an hour".

That statistic concerns Pellissippi State student Mason Cantrell. "I see a lot of people just flying through," said Cantrell. "If someone were just to walk out, something bad could happen. I think it needs to be more enforced."

Along with Hardin Valley, Deputies tell 6 News that sections along Emory Road in North Knox County can be just as bad.

"Emory Road between 75 and Norris Freeway is another instance of a road that has gotten wider with five lanes and a turn lane", says Lt. Clark. "The speed increases dramatically. People are used to driving on a two lane road and now have this nice wider road and it increases their level comfort and also their speed".

Clark's statement was confirmed when 6 News clocked motorists traveling near 60 miles per hour in a 40 zone.

Officials with the Knox County Sheriff's office say the best way to report speed concerns in the county is by calling (865) 215-2243. Officers from the department's traffic division will then be deployed to monitor conditions in that area.

If you live inside the city limits of Knoxville, you can also report a problem by calling Knoxville Police at (865) 215-7000 or 311.

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