Pat Summitt signs copies of memoir in West Knoxville

Pat Summitt signs copies of memoir in West Knoxville

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For two hours on Tuesday, Pat Summitt signed copies of her memoir at the Barnes & Noble in West Knoxville. For two hours on Tuesday, Pat Summitt signed copies of her memoir at the Barnes & Noble in West Knoxville.
Some waited in line for up to three hours to meet her. Some waited in line for up to three hours to meet her.

By MIKE KRAFCIK
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - Lady Vols Head Coach Emeritus Pat Summitt was in Knoxville on Tuesday, making lines of fans happy at a local bookstore. 

Summitt's new book called "Sum It Up" hit store shelves Tuesday. It's an inside look at her personal and professional life.  

For two hours on Tuesday, she signed copies of her memoir at the Barnes & Noble in West Knoxville.    

Summit's memoir shares a lot of lessons she's learned during her life on and off the court. 

It talks about her struggles, having a tough childhood, being a single mother, and of course, her early-onset Alzheimer's diagnosis.

Fans were sure to line up early to get a chance to have their copies signed and meet Pat Summit.

Some waited in line for up to three hours to meet her.  

The book was co-authored by Washington Post columnist Sally Jenkins, who told 6 News, the most interesting part of the book was about the relationships she's built with her players over her 38-year coaching career.  

Many fans say they are looking forward to seeing a much more personal angle of Summitt's life through this book.  

"You see her on the court but not as a mother or a friend, so I'm just looking at the more personal side of it," said Jan Yanes, a Summitt fan.  

"To think of someone that's done everything she's accomplished in her life, to see what's she's dealing with now, it's just an insight into a whole another world around her" said Dawn Lee, a Summitt fan.  

Summitt also writes that she's back on good terms with University of Connecticut Women's Basketball Head Coach Geno Auriemma.

She writes that Auriemma was the first person to donate $10,000 to the Pat Summitt Foundation to fight Alzheimer's.

Summitt was also featured Tuesday on World News with Diane Sawyer.

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