Moderate snow closes schools on Plateau

Moderate snow closes schools on Plateau

Posted:
A light dusting of snow coated cars Monday morning, but didn't accumulate on streets. A light dusting of snow coated cars Monday morning, but didn't accumulate on streets.
(AP Photo/The Kansas City Star, Joe Ledford). The Belton Street department crew works to clear snow off 163rd Street in Belton, Mo., on Sunday, March 24, 2013. (AP Photo/The Kansas City Star, Joe Ledford). The Belton Street department crew works to clear snow off 163rd Street in Belton, Mo., on Sunday, March 24, 2013.

CROSSVILLE (WATE/AP) - A band of light to moderate snow fell across the northern half of Tennessee Monday morning. In the valley the snow did little more than dust cars, but it accumulated in parts of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberland Plateau to close schools

Snow also fell in southern Kentucky, eastward in Virginia and higher elevations of East Tennessee and North Carolina.

Six school systems canceled classes and two others were delayed.


Complete List of School Closings


Brisk wind accompanied the snow as it moved into Tennessee, but temperatures will warm by mid-day Monday. Some of the snow showers change into light rain showers, but then transition back into snow as temperatures fall overnight.

The valley could have anywhere from no accumulation to up to an inch on higher ridgetops by Tuesday night, but most will be on grassy surfaces.

Two to three inches of snow is possible on the Plateau. Four to six inches or more is possible above 2500 feet in elevation.

Drier weather is expected by Wednesday.

The snow that blew into Tennessee was edge of a storm that began on Palm Sunday and pushed eastward through the midsection of the U.S.

A wide-ranging storm is burying thoughts of springtime weather across a number of Midwestern states under a blanket of snow and slush, leaving in its wake dashed Palm Sunday plans, dozens of canceled flights and treacherous roadways as it churns eastward.

The National Weather Service issued storm warnings and advisories for Sunday and Monday for as far east as Pennsylvania, and officials were blaming two deaths in separate crashes in Kansas and Missouri on snow-slicked roads.

The system was expected to move into Ohio, bringing between 5 to 9 inches, said Dan Hawblitzel, a weather service meteorologist in suburban Kansas City.

Slick roads were also being blamed for a series of crashes on Interstate 60 north of Indianapolis that sent two people to area hospitals with life-threatening injuries. The Indiana State Police reported late Sunday that two people in a 2012 Subaru were hurt when the driver lost control while coming upon the scene of a previous crash involving a semitrailer. The Subaru hit the tractor-trailer and ended up in a ditch, police said. Authorities said both driver and passenger had life-threatening injuries and were taken to area hospitals. An update on their conditions was not immediately available.

Earlier Sunday night, a jack-knifed semi and subsequent fuel leak required a hazardous materials response outside Indianapolis, officials said. The Fishers Department of Fire and Emergency Services said a tractor-trailer was southbound on Interstate 69 when its driver lost control. No one was injured.

The storm was expected to weaken as it moved into Pennsylvania late Sunday and into Monday, with totals ranging from 3 to 8 inches. Before it exits off the coast of New Jersey on Monday night, the storm could leave 2 to 4 inches in that state as well as Delaware, northern Maryland and southern New York.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. Portions are Copyright 2013, The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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