Unseasonable cold and snow could make allergy season worse

Unseasonable cold and snow could make allergy season worse

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"In the short term, what you'll see is a decrease in pollen counts," said Dr. Ty Prince. "Long term as it warms up, you might actually see a rebound of that pollen count. We see that after rain very often." "In the short term, what you'll see is a decrease in pollen counts," said Dr. Ty Prince. "Long term as it warms up, you might actually see a rebound of that pollen count. We see that after rain very often."
Dr. Prince says it's important for people who suffer from severe allergies to prepare by taking their medications now. Dr. Prince says it's important for people who suffer from severe allergies to prepare by taking their medications now.

By DREW GARDNER
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - The cold weather and snow isn't just delaying spring, it's also delaying allergy season and could be keeping the pollen counts relatively low.

Some doctors say this temporary relief may end up only making the sniffling and sneezing worse for allergy sufferers.

Even though winter continues to keep its grip on East Tennessee, a few warm spells already began the blooming process for many plants and trees.

"We had tree pollen on our counters February 7 at our West Knoxville office," said Dr. Ty Prince with the Allergy, Asthma and Sinus Center.

The continued snowfall and cold temperatures have helped ease the effects of the pollen.

"In the short term, what you'll see is a decrease in pollen counts," said Dr. Prince. "Long term as it warms up, you might actually see a rebound of that pollen count. We see that after rain very often."  

Most people's bodies have been able to recover from the initial blast of pollen, but there is a chance when that rebound happens, allergies could actually get worse.

Dr. Prince says that's why it's important for people who suffer from severe allergies to prepare by taking their medications now.

"We would recommend if you have prescribed nasal steroids, that might be beneficial to start two or three days before the pollen season starts," said Dr. Prince.

With temperatures forecast to be in the 60s over the weekend, you may only have a few more days of relief to do so.

Dr. Prince says last year's allergy season was the worst it has been in East Tennessee in the last 20 years and so far this year is starting the same way. 

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