Coyote sightings up in Knoxville

Coyote sightings up in Knoxville

Posted:
A pregnant coyote had taken up residence under the back porch of a downtown Maryville home, then gave birth to her babies. A pregnant coyote had taken up residence under the back porch of a downtown Maryville home, then gave birth to her babies.
"A coyote in the city is used to seeing people. So you can get close to him, and that's when it's more dangerous," explained Paul Antczak. "A coyote in the city is used to seeing people. So you can get close to him, and that's when it's more dangerous," explained Paul Antczak.
"They're coming up on to my porch, and I'm terrified they'll come attack one of my small grandchildren," Valerie Crabtree said. "They're coming up on to my porch, and I'm terrified they'll come attack one of my small grandchildren," Valerie Crabtree said.
Valerie Crabtree closely guards her cats, dogs and grandchildren after a few coyote sightings. Valerie Crabtree closely guards her cats, dogs and grandchildren after a few coyote sightings.

By MONA NAIR
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) – A visitor inside Knoxville city limits is causing concern in some local neighborhoods. Coyote sightings are on the rise.

Paul Antczak, owner of Predators and Prey Wildlife Control, says coyote calls in the area are up about 50 percent over the last two years. Many of the calls are from in the city.

Antczak showed video of a recent call where he found a pregnant coyote had taken up residence under the back porch of a downtown Maryville home, then gave birth to her babies.

In a populated section of Northeast Knoxville, Valerie Crabtree closely guards her cats, dogs and grandchildren after a few coyote sightings.

"The first time I saw the coyote, it was on my porch. And it came up, got one of my cats and took it off. The coyotes seem to be getting desperate. They're coming up on to my porch, and I'm terrified they'll come attack one of my small grandchildren," Crabtree said.

"A coyote in the city is used to seeing people. So you can get close to him, and that's when it's more dangerous," explained Antczak.

Because coyotes don't have access to other wild animals, city coyotes are more likely to attack go after other prey. That would include Valerie's case, where a coyote's dinner was her cat.

"It's very unnerving. You don't know what's going to be behind a bush," Crabtree said.

If you see a coyote in your neighborhood just once, you probably don't have much to worry about. But if you have regular sightings, chances are you live near a coyote den. In that situation, you should call a wildlife control service.

Powered by WorldNow

1306 N. Broadway NE Knoxville,
Tennessee 37917

Telephone: 865.637.NEWS(6397)
Fax: 865.525.4091
Email: newsroom@wate.com

Can’t find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Young Broadcasting of Knoxville, Inc. A Media General Company.