Some Scott County residents upset with White Knuckle event

Some Scott County residents upset with White Knuckle event

Posted:
"It's disturbing, but you live up here, I guess it's something you just deal with," said Beckie Foster, a Louisville, Kentucky resident who attended the festival. "It's disturbing, but you live up here, I guess it's something you just deal with," said Beckie Foster, a Louisville, Kentucky resident who attended the festival.
The event is a boon to the area's economy, but neighbors say visitors are dumping more than their money in the community and they aren't happy about it. The event is a boon to the area's economy, but neighbors say visitors are dumping more than their money in the community and they aren't happy about it.
‘You're always going to always have someone who doesn't like what you're doing, but I think on the whole positive side, it's good for the community," said Humphrey. ‘You're always going to always have someone who doesn't like what you're doing, but I think on the whole positive side, it's good for the community," said Humphrey.
State law prohibits the use of ATVs on any state highway. State law prohibits the use of ATVs on any state highway.

HUNTSVILLE (WATE) -  The White Knuckle Festival draws thousands of riders to Scott County from all over the country.

It's boon to the area's economy, but neighbors say visitors are dumping more than their money in the community and they aren't happy about it.

Aaron Parton hasn't gotten much sleep this weekend.

"It started Thursday. It's constantly four-wheelers after four-wheelers, loud pipes, everything. It gets crazy," Parton said. 

Parton's home is located about a mile from the tracks used for the White Knuckle event. 

Many of the 10,000 people who attended White Knuckle rode in on their ATVs. They could be seen driving through many small residential neighborhoods in the town of Huntsville, including the street Parton lives on.

"My mom's boyfriend, who was out here weeding the other day, a guy drives by, throws a beer can at him," said Parton.

Other residents have also complained over the years.

Tim Phillips, who lives near the ATV tracks, wrote on the 6 News Facebook page, "We have had animals killed, vehicles damaged, our yard vandalized, and things like full beer cans thrown at picture windows multiple times."

Phillips says he has gotten little to no support from law enforcement and government officials after complaining about these problems for years.  

"It's disturbing, but you live up here, I guess it's something you just deal with," said Beckie Foster, a Louisville, Ky. resident who attended the festival.

Other residents have reported seeing ATV riders using the main roads, and reported seeing riders drink and drive throughout the weekend.

The Scott County Sheriff's Department says they've handed out numerous citations for open container violations. 

This was the first year the department started to crack down on traffic violations.

The department along with the Tennessee Highway Patrol cited riders for using ATVs on State Highway 63.

Authorities say there have been a growing number of accidents involving ATVs on the highway before this year's event.

State law prohibits the use of ATVs on any state highway.

"They've never said anything before, but this year they wouldn't let them ride on the highway," said Denny Humphrey, an event organizer.

The 2013 version of the annual spring event is being called largest and most successful ever, despite the various complaints.

‘You're always going to always have someone who doesn't like what you're doing, but I think on the whole positive side, it's good for the community," said Humphrey.

White Knuckle is the largest event held at Brimstone Recreation Area.

Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and WATE. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.