Father-daughter team begins restoring pre-Civil War home

Father-daughter team begins restoring pre-Civil War home in West Knoxville

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Work recently got underway at the Kennedy-Baker-Walker-Sherrill House. Work recently got underway at the Kennedy-Baker-Walker-Sherrill House.
The antebellum architecture is rare in Knox County. The antebellum architecture is rare in Knox County.
Some of the former owners (and their cats). (Source: Knox Heritage) Some of the former owners (and their cats). (Source: Knox Heritage)
A look at the back of the building. A look at the back of the building.
"It's a wonderful feeling to see properties come off the Fragile 15 list," said Knox Heritage Assistant Director Becky Hancock. "The Walker-Sherrill house is one we've been working on for a long time." "It's a wonderful feeling to see properties come off the Fragile 15 list," said Knox Heritage Assistant Director Becky Hancock. "The Walker-Sherrill house is one we've been working on for a long time."

By JOSH AULT
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - The Kennedy-Baker-Walker-Sherrill House is getting a new lease on life.

The property, also known as the Walker-Sherrill House, was on the verge of falling apart and made Knox Heritage's Fragile 15 list for at least seven years.

The home, at 9320 Kingston Pike in West Knoxville, is named after the four families that have owned it over the years.

Bill Hodges, and his daughter, Caty, purchased the property last fall and are in the process of transforming it into an office building.

"It's a wonderful feeling to see properties come off the Fragile 15 list," said Knox Heritage Assistant Director Becky Hancock. "The Walker-Sherrill house is one we've been working on for a long time."

The home, built in 1849, has a rich history.

"The Walker-Sherrill house was really important because it was one of the few antebellum or pre-Civil War homes still standing in Knox County," said Hancock. "It's a rare type of architecture that doesn't exist anymore."

There was some fear the home would be knocked down with recent commercial development all around the property.

Many people who work in this area are glad to see it saved.

"It's a thrill to have it restored, because for so long it was looking like it was on its last leg, literally," said Ed Pasley, who works close to the house.

"I just want to say thanks to Bill and Caty Hodges," said Hancock. "They will do a wonderful job, and it has been a joy to work with them."

The Hodges say it will take about two years for the restoration to be complete.

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