2 Tennessee Walking Horses missing from Big South Fork

2 Tennessee Walking Horses missing from Big South Fork National Park

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"I wouldn't want this to happen to anybody who has any feeling whatsoever towards animals," said Arlene DeSplinter, who owns the horses named "Sisco" and "Stormy" along with her husband Al. "I wouldn't want this to happen to anybody who has any feeling whatsoever towards animals," said Arlene DeSplinter, who owns the horses named "Sisco" and "Stormy" along with her husband Al.
The horses do have bits in their mouths. So that means they likely can't eat much, have lost some weight and are hungry. The horses do have bits in their mouths. So that means they likely can't eat much, have lost some weight and are hungry.
"A horse, at their own pace, can cover pretty close to 100 miles a day. They could have potentially left the park and gone to someone's backyard," explained True West Campground owner Donna Martin. "A horse, at their own pace, can cover pretty close to 100 miles a day. They could have potentially left the park and gone to someone's backyard," explained True West Campground owner Donna Martin.

JAMESTOWN (WATE) – A massive search is underway for two Tennessee Walking Horses that disappeared Saturday in the 125,000-acre Big South Fork National Park.

A group of horse lovers from Illinois are staying at True West Campground in Jamestown this week. Their visit was meant to be a celebration, with one horse lover celebrating his 55th birthday and another couple celebrating their 30th wedding anniversary.

The disappearance of the horses has upset the owners.

"I wouldn't want this to happen to anybody who has any feeling whatsoever towards animals. They are our second kids," said an emotional Arlene DeSplinter, who owns the horses named "Sisco" and "Stormy" with her husband Al.

The couple says they had been riding Saturday when they stopped on top of a hill. Something spooked the animals.

"It was like all of a sudden there was a chain reaction, and the two of them gallop down the trail," Arlene said, describing how they took off.

"A horse, at their own pace, can cover pretty close to 100 miles a day. They could have potentially left the park and gone to someone's backyard," explained True West Campground owner Donna Martin.

The campground owners have been promoting the search in social media. They have some leads, but Sisco and Stormy remain missing.

"They haven't been alone ever and they're out there by themselves. They're trying to survive," DeSplinter said.

The horses have bits in their mouths, so they likely can't eat much, have probably lost weight and are hungry.

If you see the horses, contact your local law enforcement agency.

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