Knox County Schools says buildings regularly inspected

In wake of JCHS roof collapse, Knox County Schools says buildings are inspected regularly

Posted:
"If that building had been inspected very carefully, there would be signs there," Knox County Plan Examiner Ron Mauer said. "If that building had been inspected very carefully, there would be signs there," Knox County Plan Examiner Ron Mauer said.
"Aging buildings do need to be checked," Sharon McMillan said. "Aging buildings do need to be checked," Sharon McMillan said.

By SAMANTHA MANNING
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - In the wake of the roof collapse at Jefferson County High School Sunday, 6 News learned more about inspections at Knox County schools.

A spokesperson for the Knox County school district said all schools are inspected at least every six weeks by maintenance and custodial personnel.

The district said inspections overlook things like safety, electric and cleanliness.

Sharon McMillan has worked for Carter Elementary for more than 25 years and used to work in the old building.

"Aging buildings do need to be checked," McMillan said.

McMillan said the old building had problems including mold and non-working heating systems but said the Knox County School district was diligent in checking the problems and resolving them as soon as possible.

"They tried to accommodate for the aging building and when a tile would come up, they would come and fix the tile. As far as mold, anytime there was an issue it was taken care of," McMillan said.

Jefferson County High School officials said the school is inspected once a year by a fire marshal and a monthly check is conducted by maintenance workers.

JCHS officials said they had no way of knowing that the roof was in danger of collapsing because it was a structural issue.

"If that building had been inspected very carefully, there would be signs there," Knox County Plan Examiner Ron Mauer said.

Students said the high school has leaks all over the campus and Mauer said that could be a sign of a bigger problem, possibly a structural one.

"Leaks end up deteriorating the structure whether it be wood, steel or concrete and if that building had a lot of leakage, absolutely it should be looked at very carefully," Mauer said.

The Knox County School District said if parents are concerned about any issues with their child's school building, they can contact the school's principal or assistant principal for more information on the condition of the school building.

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