Excessive driftwood causing problems at one lakefront home

Excessive driftwood causing problems at one lakefront home

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Homeowner Tesha Haggard says they already paid thousands of dollars to have the wood removed once. Homeowner Tesha Haggard says they already paid thousands of dollars to have the wood removed once.
"We can't take the boat out, because we don't want to damage the boat. We can't swim out here anymore. It's dangerous to swim. We found snakes in the wood pile. So it's a breeding ground for snakes now. It's not safe," Tesha Haggard said. "We can't take the boat out, because we don't want to damage the boat. We can't swim out here anymore. It's dangerous to swim. We found snakes in the wood pile. So it's a breeding ground for snakes now. It's not safe," Tesha Haggard said.
Along with the wood, there's a whole lot of garbage that washes in as well--plastic bottles, toys, even a fuel tank showed up one day. Along with the wood, there's a whole lot of garbage that washes in as well--plastic bottles, toys, even a fuel tank showed up one day.

By MONA NAIR
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) – With all the extra rain we've had lately, people living by the water have seen a whole lot of driftwood.

For one family living on Fort Loudoun Lake in Knox County, the situation has turned into a summer nightmare.

Loads of driftwood washes into their cove. Tesha Haggard estimates it'll take two construction sized dumpsters to take all of it out.

"We can't take the boat out, because we don't want to damage the boat. We can't swim out here anymore. It's dangerous to swim. We found snakes in the wood pile. So it's a breeding ground for snakes now. It's not safe," she explained.

Along with the wood, there's a whole lot of garbage that washes in as well--plastic bottles, toys, even a fuel tank showed up one day.

Haggard says they already paid thousands of dollars to have the wood removed once.

"We had to hire labor to load all of the wood on the dumpster. And as soon as that was done, all the wood was back," she said.

So she called TVA.

"And they told us it's not their problem, it's our problem," Haggard said.

TVA released this statement to 6 News about the issue- "An unusual amount of floating debris can be expected because of high water and erosion across the Tennessee River system. Recent rainfall has created these conditions, as it does any time there is a major rainfall event. TVA's primary goal is to manage the river system and prevent extensive flooding where possible. TVA cannot be and is not responsible for cleaning up debris along the 11,000 miles of shoreline in the system. The cost of any clean-up effort would fall to the ratepayers across the Valley and then be reflected in power rates. TVA does remove debris when it threatens navigation or the safe operation of our dams."

So for now, it stays the way it is. Haggard is frustrated at a situation that's ruining her summer, and just won't float away.

"As soon as you take a piece of wood out, there's two more pieces in its spot. We can't maintain it anymore," she said.

 

 

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