Yearly average of rainfall in 7 months - wreaks havoc on farmers

Area reaches yearly average of rainfall in 7 months, wreaks havoc on farmers

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All the water can be dangerous for young poultry Wisner says if their feathers aren't in fully, when they get wet, the birds can get cold and sick and pass away. All the water can be dangerous for young poultry Wisner says if their feathers aren't in fully, when they get wet, the birds can get cold and sick and pass away.
"We've got gullies everywhere on the farm that we don't normally have. We have ponds where there have never been ponds before," said Wade Wisner. "We've got gullies everywhere on the farm that we don't normally have. We have ponds where there have never been ponds before," said Wade Wisner.

By STEPHANIE BEECKEN
6 News Reporter

DANDRIDGE (WATE) - East Tennessee has received more than a year's worth of rain in seven months. In a year, the average is 47.86 inches of rain. Already this year 48.1 inches of rain has fallen.

All this rainfall is wreaking havoc on farmers. Problems for farmers could mean higher costs at the grocery store for consumers.

Wade and Lucy Wisner established Wisner Farms in 2007. They raise and sell all natural, grass fed meats and poultry. But the task of farming has been difficult this year with all the rain.

"It's about two feet deep in there and normally the cows are in there cooling off in their mud bath," said Wisner.

One of the Wisners' barns is flooded and their gravel drive way keeps washing away.

"We've got gullies everywhere on the farm that we don't normally have. We have ponds where there have never been ponds before," said Wade Wisner.

While the animals may like the extra ponds Lucy Wisner wishes they weren't there.

"I don't like having a pond over there because there are flies and mosquitos. They are all attracted to water," said Lucy Wisner.

All the water can be dangerous for young poultry, Wisner says. If their feathers aren't in fully, when they get wet, the birds can get cold and sick and pass away.

The rain has also prevented him from moving the animals from field to field for proper feeding and natural fertilization.

The Wisner barn is normally packed with hay but right now the Wisners haven't been able to get more than 24 bails due to the rain.

"The hay is ruined. The hay it's ruined," said Wisner.

The Wisners say if farmers can't get in a second and third crop of hay the price will go up.

"That means the price of beef goes up, the price of pork goes up, the price of everything goes up," said

Despite all the negative effects of the rain, there is a positive. These pastures are flourishing which means the grass fed animals like the cattle are very well fed.

"I've mowed pastures more this year then I have in the past two years so that means the grass is growing, the cows are looking big, the animals are doing well by it," said Wisner.

The Wisners are hoping for moderate weather in the near future.

"Not too hot not go into a drought to have some rain but not to the extent that we have had it," said Lucy Wisner.

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