Tennessee teachers gather in Knoxville to tackle bullying

Tennessee teachers gather in Knoxville to tackle bullying

Posted:
More than 700 teachers from all over Tennessee gathered Tuesday for a first-ever Anti-Bullying Summit. More than 700 teachers from all over Tennessee gathered Tuesday for a first-ever Anti-Bullying Summit.
"This is very important because it does affect the lives of our young people and they are our future," said Capt. Bob Wooldridge, with KPD's Safety Education Unit. "This is very important because it does affect the lives of our young people and they are our future," said Capt. Bob Wooldridge, with KPD's Safety Education Unit.
"[Bullying] can go on in middle and high school and even into adulthood," said Karen Clark, a special education teacher at Dogwood Elementary in Knoxville. "[Bullying] can go on in middle and high school and even into adulthood," said Karen Clark, a special education teacher at Dogwood Elementary in Knoxville.

By HAYLEY HARMON
6 News Anchor/Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - With the new school year about to start, students across the state are preparing to head back to class.

Teachers are doing the same thing, and this year they have a big goal. They're going to take a stand against bullying.

More than 700 teachers from all over Tennessee gathered Tuesday for a first-ever Anti-Bullying Summit. It was hosted by the Knoxville Police Department.

"This is very important because it does affect the lives of our young people and they are our future," said Capt. Bob Wooldridge, with KPD's Safety Education Unit.

Teachers say they want to work against what they call a growing issue in Tennessee classrooms.

"It can have lifelong effects. I mean, I'm at the elementary level, but it can go on in middle and high school and even into adulthood," said Karen Clark, a special education teacher at Dogwood Elementary in Knoxville.

In a recent survey, more than 70 percent of students reported bullying as an ongoing problem.

"It can be devastating to children. It can cause them to be depressed, not want to go to school. Physical illness and sometimes absence from school," said Capt. Wooldridge.

Wooldridge says bullying is now at its worst, especially with the addition of cyber-bullying, which turns the abuse into a 24/7 problem for students.

At the summit, the teachers learned strategies to combat bullying, like how to spot it early, how to counsel students who've been bullied and how to get them to come forward if someone is targeting them.

"That teacher needs to report it to a school administrator, principal or school resource officer; know right away so that we can prevent harm to that child," said Wooldridge.

The teachers know better than anyone that students can't do their best in school if they're worried about being bullied.

That's why they're doing their part to make all Tennessee schools a safe and secure place for students to learn.

"Parents needs to know that when they drop their children off at school that they are going to be safe. That's what we need to get back to," said Craft.

The summit is part of KPD's ongoing anti-bulling campaign.

A dozen billboards have been posted in Knoxville that say "Take a Stand Against Bullying."

Officers hope to raise awareness of the problem and encourage the community to work together to reduce it.

KPD says a parent's role is equally important in the fight against bullying.

Officers encourage parents to talk to their children about their school day everyday when they get home.

Parents should sure their children feel comfortable sharing if they're being bullied so that the problem can be addressed.

Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and WATE. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.