Young Harriman boy helps to remove offensive Facebook page

Young Harriman boy with autism helps to remove offensive Facebook page

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Jake Wray, 10, used the power of Facebook to help remove an online page that poked fun at Asperger's Syndrome, a form of autism. Jake Wray, 10, used the power of Facebook to help remove an online page that poked fun at Asperger's Syndrome, a form of autism.
Jake's Facebook fan page called help "Get Jake Wray 1 million fans" is his outlet, according to his father. Jake's Facebook fan page called help "Get Jake Wray 1 million fans" is his outlet, according to his father.

By MIKE KRAFCIK
6 News Reporter

HARRIMAN (WATE) - A Harriman boy used the power of Facebook to help remove an online page that poked fun at Asperger's Syndrome, a form of autism.  

Jake Wray, 10, has autism; 6 News first profiled Jake in June when he told us about his love for storm chasing.

Wray was diagnosed with autism at the age of 5.

Jake's Facebook fan page called help "Get Jake Wray 1 million fans" is his outlet, according to his father.  

His parents typically post on his page about things that are on Jake's mind. "It's great for him, because he has some social issues and he doesn't like ask questions, he doesn't have a lot of conversations in person," said Jake's father Nathan Wray. 

Jake's Facebook page has racked up around 2,700 followers. 

Many of those followers were outraged when Jake's father discovered a link to that led to a Facebook page making fun of people with Asperger's.  

Asperger's is a form of high functioning of autism similar to what Jake has.

"We went to Jake's Facebook page immediately to say hey, we need you guys to report this site, to take it down, it's offensive," said Nathan Wray. 

Facebook has a policy that does not permit hate speech, or allow anyone to attack others based on a medical condition, but distinguishes between serious and humorous speech.   Scores of Jake's followers reported the page to Facebook. 

It took less than 24 hours for the site to receive enough comments for the page to be taken down. 

"It was awesome, when they deleted the page yesterday. It was unbelievable," said Jake Wray.

Nathan Wray says the offensive page didn't upset his son, but says Jake knew it was wrong, and was happy to see it go away.  

More importantly, his family wanted to spread the message about Jake's condition.

"Autism doesn't mean people are different. It means they have certain skills, different ways of going about handling things," said Nathan Wray. 

Jake has a goal to get one million Facebook fans. His father says they wanted to teach Jake that he can make a goal, and even if you don't achieve it, at least he tried.

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