East Tennesseans remember local victims killed in 9/11 attacks

East Tennesseans remember local victims killed in 9/11 attacks

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Hundreds turned out to the annual 9/11 Memorial Service in downtown Knoxville, hosted jointly by the City of Knoxville and Knox County. Hundreds turned out to the annual 9/11 Memorial Service in downtown Knoxville, hosted jointly by the City of Knoxville and Knox County.
The names of the three people from East Tennessee were killed in the attacks were read aloud at the ceremony. The names of the three people from East Tennessee were killed in the attacks were read aloud at the ceremony.

By HAYLEY HARMON
6 News Anchor/Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - East Tennesseans gathered Wednesday to remember the victims of 9/11, honoring the innocent lives that were lost, including three from Knoxville.

Hundreds turned out to the annual 9/11 Memorial Service in downtown Knoxville, hosted jointly by the City of Knoxville and Knox County.

The lives lost on Sept. 11, 2001 were heavy on the hearts of those in attendance, exactly 12 years after the tragedy.

The names of the three people from East Tennessee were killed in the attacks were read aloud at the ceremony.

"Timothy Aaron Haviland. John Robinson Lenoir. He went by Rob. William Anthony Karnes, who went by Tony," read Knox County Sheriff's Office Chaplain Mark Steimer.

The reading was followed by a moment of silence to honor their memory, as family members looked on.

"He didn't come home that day, along with 3000 others," said Pat Lenoir of Knoxville, whose son Rob worked in the second tower.

Lenoir says it's hard to believe this much time has passed.

"This is what makes me realize 12 years have indeed gone by, when we see the ages of the children who were left," said Lenoir.

Brenda Vandever, whose brother Tony Karnes was killed, says the pain is fresh again as she marks the anniversary of the day he died.

"It brought tears because then I saw the towers fall. He was on the 97th floor of tower one," said Vandever. "I just miss him. Really bad."

She hopes that no matter how much time passes, the lives lost will never be forgotten.

"The nation as a whole needs to remember this event so that we won't become complacent. We need to be vigilant at all times," said Vandever.

"We just can't forget," said Lenoir.

The bells of First Baptist Church downtown ran at 8:46 a.m. and 9:03 a.m., marking the exact moment each of the twin towers was struck.

Dozens of local firefighters and police officers were also at the 9/11 ceremony to honor the first responders who were killed trying to save the lives of civilians.

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