'2 Million Bikers Ride' arrives in Washington, D.C.

'2 Million Bikers Ride' arrives in Washington, D.C.

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The motorcyclists went to our nation's capitol to pay their respects to the victims, heroes and survivors of 9/11. The motorcyclists went to our nation's capitol to pay their respects to the victims, heroes and survivors of 9/11.
The rally was organized in response to the "Million Muslim March." The rally was organized in response to the "Million Muslim March."
"I think that we should, every year, have something going on like this so that we never forget what happened up there that day," said Jim Rehrman, of Jamestown. "I think that we should, every year, have something going on like this so that we never forget what happened up there that day," said Jim Rehrman, of Jamestown.
"I had a friend that I worked with in Nashville on 9/11 when it happened, and his son was killed in one of the towers," said Crossville rider Bill Sanders. "I had a friend that I worked with in Nashville on 9/11 when it happened, and his son was killed in one of the towers," said Crossville rider Bill Sanders.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (WATE) - East Tennesseans participating in the "Two Million Bikers Ride" arrived Wednesday in Washington, D.C.

The rally was organized in response to the "Million Muslim March."

The motorcyclists decided to go to our nation's capitol to pay their respects to the victims, heroes and survivors of 9/11.

6 News photojournalist David Raborn traveled with the bikers to our nation's capitol and spoke to bikers participating in the rally.

"I think that we should, every year, have something going on like this so that we never forget what happened up there that day," said Jim Rehrman, of Jamestown.

"We just need to stand tall. We need to reach out to the brother and sister that's sat there struggling," said "Top Fuel" Bill, the found of the ride. "We got to stick together."

"Today I'm riding for Alfred Vukosa. I didn't ever know the man, but I hope his family knows I'm here for him," said Mark Carr, of Cumming, Ga.

"I had a friend that I worked with in Nashville on 9/11 when it happened, and his son was killed in one of the towers," said Crossville rider Bill Sanders. "I never have forgot that. I met him in the elevator right after it happened and he told me that his wife had just called him and told him that the towers had been hit, and that she was going berserk. He didn't know at that time his son was already dead."

"I saw how it affected him," Sanders continued as he choked up. "And it should affect everybody that way."

As for the "Million Muslims March," it's estimated that only a few dozen people participated. 

One speaker at the event called for social justice for Muslims while promoting peace and condemning violence. Others talked about conspiracy theories surrounding 9/11.

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