Citizens hope their voices curb speeding concerns in Knoxville

Citizens hope their voices curb speeding concerns in Knoxville

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In the short time 6 News was on McWhorter's road Monday evening, we saw several cars going well above the posted 30 mph speed limit. In the short time 6 News was on McWhorter's road Monday evening, we saw several cars going well above the posted 30 mph speed limit.
"In an attempt to avoid congestion or traffic signals, motorists may be cutting through neighborhoods. The feeling is that they are driving through these neighborhoods at a high rate of speed," said Martin Percy, with the City of Knoxville. "In an attempt to avoid congestion or traffic signals, motorists may be cutting through neighborhoods. The feeling is that they are driving through these neighborhoods at a high rate of speed," said Martin Percy, with the City of Knoxville.
"It feels disrespectful. It feels like they're bullies in cars," explained Sandy McWhorter who lives On Davida Road. "It feels disrespectful. It feels like they're bullies in cars," explained Sandy McWhorter who lives On Davida Road.

KNOXVILLE (WATE) – Knoxville citizens with concerns about speeding hope their voices will help curb the problem.

A series of public meetings are being held in Knoxville to hear from residents about the issue as city leaders draw up a new city-wide traffic calming policy.

"It feels disrespectful. It feels like they're bullies in cars," said Sandy McWhorter, who lives on Davida Road.

In the short time 6 News was on her road Monday evening, we saw several cars going well above the posted 30 mph speed limit.

"I have tried making reports to KPD, talking to neighbors, and getting a little neighborhood involvement. I have stood out there and yelled at people to slow down. It gets overwhelming," she added.

Her efforts, however, have not done much to improve the situation, and that's why she attended a public meeting about the new traffic calming policy.

"In an attempt to avoid congestion or traffic signals, motorists may be cutting through neighborhoods. The feeling is that they are driving through these neighborhoods at a high rate of speed," said Martin Percy, with the City of Knoxville's Traffic Engineering Division.

City leaders have been listening to the public at these sessions. They're gathering input for their new policy.

"We look for themes, feeling and opinions that people have," Percy said.

McWhorter hopes Davida Road makes it into their game plan. For her, it's change that can't come soon enough.

"I'm afraid a pedestrian may get run over. I'm afraid my daughter's school bus will get into an accident," McWhorter said.

You don't have to attend a meeting to voice your concern about speeding in a neighborhood.

You can submit information on the city website, by e-mailing traffic.calming@cityofknoxville.org, or via postal mail to:

David Massey
Office of Neighborhoods-Room 528
City of Knoxville
P.O. Box 1631
Knoxville, TN 37901

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