Football team practices for the first time since accident

Kingston football team practices for the first time since accident

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The team's athletic trainer says every player has a different tolerance for pain and by knowing how each football player reacts, she was able to get Haynes the care he needed within minutes. The team's athletic trainer says every player has a different tolerance for pain and by knowing how each football player reacts, she was able to get Haynes the care he needed within minutes.
Rossi was the first one to respond to Friday night's injury. She says initially she didn't think Haynes had broken his neck, but her job was figuring out what was really going on by asking questions. Rossi was the first one to respond to Friday night's injury. She says initially she didn't think Haynes had broken his neck, but her job was figuring out what was really going on by asking questions.
The Kingston yellow jackets warmed up Tuesday afternoon for the first time since Friday night's game. Number 10, Seth Haynes, was missing from the field Tuesday, but he's in the back of his teammates' minds. The Kingston yellow jackets warmed up Tuesday afternoon for the first time since Friday night's game. Number 10, Seth Haynes, was missing from the field Tuesday, but he's in the back of his teammates' minds.
"It puts you on edge and you want to make sure that you're watching what's going on," said the team's Certified Athletic Trainer Jennifer Rossi. "It puts you on edge and you want to make sure that you're watching what's going on," said the team's Certified Athletic Trainer Jennifer Rossi.

By LAURA HALM
6 News Reporter

KINGSTON (WATE) - A Roane County football team hit the practice field Tuesday for the first time since one of their teammates broke his neck during Friday night's game. Their trainer credits swift thinking and team work with first responders for helping save the player's life.

Sophomore Seth Haynes broke his neck making a tackle during the opening play of the school's game against Sequoyah. Doctors at UT Medical Center did surgery to repair his shattered vertebrae and say he will be able to walk again.

The team's athletic trainer says every player has a different tolerance for pain and by knowing how each football player reacts, she was able to get Haynes the care he needed within minutes.

The Kingston yellow jackets warmed up Tuesday afternoon for the first time since Friday night's game. Number 10, Seth Haynes, was missing from the field Tuesday, but he's in the back of his teammates' minds.

"We're thinking about it and we're not really wanting to get hurt. We always have that hit in the back of our head," said player Paul Bolden.

These football players aren't alone.

"It puts you on edge and you want to make sure that you're watching what's going on," said the team's Certified Athletic Trainer Jennifer Rossi.

Rossi was the first one to respond to Friday night's injury. She says initially she didn't think Haynes had broken his neck, but her job was figuring out what was really going on by asking questions.

"He had tingling, he was complaining that his neck hurt, he told me that it kind of felt like pins and needles. And those are all neurological symptoms that are red flags for us," added Rossi.

Rossi says because first responders were able to stabilize and load Haynes onto the spine board the right way, they helped save his life. She says it's a miracle the young football player will be able to walk.

"He may not play football but maybe I can recruit him as an athletic trainer," she said.

Parents watching Tuesday's practice say they're considering the what-ifs.

"So I think about could that have been my kid? Because my son plays the same position," said Robert Borum.

Teammates are planning to somehow get their friend back out on the field.

"We're getting number 10 stickers for our helmets," said player Riley Adcock.

Rossi says she is working to get more trainers like herself at the other Roane County schools within the next year. We're told right now there are two trainers for the five high schools.

6 News checked to see if area school systems have any policies in place regarding athletic trainers at school sporting events. Roane County Director of Schools says there isn't a policy, but they do have a practice in place. Athletic trainers are at every football game along with an EMS team.

Roane County tries to have trainers at every basketball game, but that isn't always possible. Roane schools do not have EMS teams at basketball games.

Knox County Schools also have a practice in place and not a policy. Each high school has one athletic trainer for sporting events through a partnership with Knoxville Orthopedic Clinic. A school spokesperson said all high school football games are covered and if multiple sporting events are going on the trainers use their expertise to determine where to go.

Loudon High School has an athletic trainer at home games for football, basketball, soccer, and volleyball. In addition an orthopedic doctor and EMS are on hand. The trainer travels with the football and basketball teams at times.

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