Knoxville neighborhood prepares for trick-or-treaters

Knoxville neighborhood prepares for trick-or-treaters

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Residents in the Island Home neighborhood expect the streets to be packed with trick-or-treaters. Residents in the Island Home neighborhood expect the streets to be packed with trick-or-treaters.
"I think this year I've spent about $83, $85 on candy, but that doesn't include the chocolate and the coffee," Rick Bowling said. "I think this year I've spent about $83, $85 on candy, but that doesn't include the chocolate and the coffee," Rick Bowling said.
Every year Rick Bowling uses a counter to know just how many candy seekers show up. Every year Rick Bowling uses a counter to know just how many candy seekers show up.
"When we run out [of candy], we just turn out the lights and close the door, but they still come and knock on the door," said Jackie Monday. "When we run out [of candy], we just turn out the lights and close the door, but they still come and knock on the door," said Jackie Monday.

By KAYLA STRAYER
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - Despite rain in the forecast, thousands of trick-or-treaters are packing Knoxville neighborhoods Thursday night.

Some residents say rain or shine, they'll stick with the traditional door-to-door method.

People in the Island Home neighborhood say candy seekers come here from all over on Halloween, mainly because it's known as a safe area for pedestrians.

Halloween night is a big deal for Rick Bowling.

"I think this year I've spent about $83, $85 on candy, but that doesn't include the chocolate and the coffee," he said.

Bowling lives along Island Home Boulevard, a street that he says attracts trick-or-treaters from all over.

"The entire neighborhood will be decked out and ready for Halloween," Bowling said.

Every year he uses a counter to know just how many candy seekers show up.

"Last year we had 1,426 people."

Since 1975, Rick's been handing out more than candy. He uses Halloween as a way to share his beliefs.

"The goal is to spread the ministry and the gospel of Jesus Christ. That's our goal, and of course to be able to show off the neighborhood is secondary," he said.

Jackie Monday lives across the street from Bowling. She says rain or shine, she'll be handing out candy.

"It's rained before and they still come," she said.

With so many trick-or-treaters, she normally runs out of candy.

"When we run out, we just turn out the lights and close the door, but they still come and knock on the door," said Monday.

As a reminder, there's no official trick-or-treat times, but city officials say it typically begins around dusk.

If you welcome visitors, just leave your porch light on.

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