Knox Co. farm raided after several children sickened with E.coli

Knox Co. farm raided after several children sickened with E. coli

Posted:
Patrol cars lined the farm's driveway Thursday as investigators collected samples from the cattle and their milk, trying to find where the E. coli outbreak came from. Patrol cars lined the farm's driveway Thursday as investigators collected samples from the cattle and their milk, trying to find where the E. coli outbreak came from.
"We were aware of it and our customers have all been made aware of it several times," said owner Marcie McBee. "We were aware of it and our customers have all been made aware of it several times," said owner Marcie McBee.
"In children, in particular, if they get E. coli 157 and the symptoms would be fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. They can kind of have a mild case and then in a few days they can get really sick," said Knox County Health Director Martha Buchanan. "In children, in particular, if they get E. coli 157 and the symptoms would be fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. They can kind of have a mild case and then in a few days they can get really sick," said Knox County Health Director Martha Buchanan.

By LAURA HALM
6 News Reporter

MASCOT (WATE) - Deputies and Health Department workers swarmed a Knox County dairy farm Thursday after health officials say several children were sickened with E. coli.

The owner of McBee Dairy Farm on Strong Road in Mascot says she warns all her customers about the risk. Tennesseans can legally drink raw milk if they own the cow and McBee Dairy Farm is a privately owned cow-share operation.

Patrol cars lined the farm's driveway Thursday as investigators collected samples from the cattle and their milk, trying to find where the E. coli outbreak came from.

"We were aware of it and our customers have all been made aware of it several times," said owner Marcie McBee.

No one can purchase raw cow or goat milk from the farm after a cease and desist order was issued. The owner is now defending her farm, which produces 450 gallons of milk per week.

"Our goal is to keep our customers safe," added McBee.

At least three children were hospitalized with illness from E. coli. "We advised everyone to stop drinking their milk and hold it until we got our testing back," said McBee.

Knox County Health officials saying diet is the common thread with these children.

"In children, in particular, if they get E. coli 157 and the symptoms would be fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. They can kind of have a mild case and then in a few days they can get really sick," said Knox County Health Director Martha Buchanan.

The Health Department will contact anyone who may have purchased this milk.

"If we got positive testing back we would split up all the cows and find out where it's coming from and we would put everybody on hold until all of it was straightened out," said McBee.

McBee says she understands the concerns and threat to public safety, "In the bigger scheme of things it breaks down to whether you want to drink raw milk or not."

McBee Dairy Farm hopes to be delivering milk by the end of next week, once testing wraps up.

Powered by WorldNow

1306 N. Broadway NE Knoxville,
Tennessee 37917

Telephone: 865.637.NEWS(6397)
Fax: 865.525.4091
Email: newsroom@wate.com

Can’t find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Young Broadcasting of Knoxville, Inc. A Media General Company.