Knoxville woman tries to reach her family in the Philippines

Knoxville woman still trying to reach her family in the Philippines

Posted:
Charito Moulden's family still lives in the Philippines. She talks to her brother, sisters, nieces and nephews on a regular basis but she hasn't been able to reach them on the phone since before the storm. Charito Moulden's family still lives in the Philippines. She talks to her brother, sisters, nieces and nephews on a regular basis but she hasn't been able to reach them on the phone since before the storm.

By STEPHANIE BEECKEN
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - As many as 10,000 people are feared dead in the Philippines. The government says two million or more have been affected by super typhoon Haiyan. Entire cities were leveled by the storm. Many who survived the storm, which could be the strongest to ever make landfall, are now without food, drinking water or shelter.

Some aid has started coming in, but as if the Filipino people haven't suffered enough, there is another typhoon on its way to the disaster zone.

Even though the super typhoon hit on the other side of the globe, some people in Knoxville are feeling the impact, worried about their loved ones in the Philippines whom they haven't heard from since before the storm.

"Yeah, thank you for that. I'm trying to get in touch with them right now. I haven't heard from them yet," said Charito Moulden as she answered her work phone.

The phone keeps ringing at Moulden's restaurant as concerned friends call to check in. Unfortunately, Moulden still hasn't received the call she's so desperately been hoping for.

"I got very upset. I came to work and I was crying and praying for my family," said Moulden.

Moulden moved to Knoxville in 1975. She opened her restaurant Philippine Egg Roll Express just a few years ago.

Her family still lives in the Philippines. She talks to her brother, sisters, nieces and nephews on a regular basis but she hasn't been able to reach them on the phone since before the storm.

"It's heartbreaking you know. I pray, pray for them that they are safe," said Moulden.

Just before the storm, Moulden's family was adding on to their home in the Philippines.

Moulden has been keeping a close eye on the news coverage and says the storm did damage to the city where her family lives, Calinan-Davao City.

"They've got the heavy rain and in same town house blown and house flooded," she said.

To help the hundreds of thousands of people displaced in the aftermath of the super typhoon, the U.S. government is stepping in, shipping shelter, food, and hygiene supplies. Moulden is pleased to see the assistance going to her native country.

"We are grateful and thankful for America to help, and I'm blessed, too, to be here," said Moulden.

The super typhoon may have killed as many as 10,000 people, and while a new storm approaches the nation, Moulden relies on faith that her family is still safe.

"Let's just hope and pray. They always say God is in control. He is in charge," said Moulden.

Since Moulden has not been able to reach her family by phone, she says she will try Tuesday to send a telegram to her loved ones. Moulden will send the message that she loves them and wants to know if they are okay.

The American Red Cross has deployed some disaster and telecommunications specialists to the Philippines. The Red Cross is also trying to help those in the Philippines communicate with their friends and loved ones around the world.

On the Red Cross' website, those in the Philippines can write if they are safe. Families can then check the site.

The Red Cross is also taking monetary donations to get necessary supplies to those displaced by the storm.

"We need that help and we need it right away because there are real lives at risk. You've talked about the number of people who have already died there, and there are so many who still need help. They need clean water, and they need food, and they need that right now. And if we don't get that to them, this disaster could get even worse," said Red Cross Spokesperson Benjamin Prijatel.

The Red Cross says monetary donations are best because the cost of shipping donated items from the U.S. is costly. It's better to purchase the needed items closer to the Philippines.

To make a donation, you can go to the Red Cross website, call the local office at (865) 584-2999 or 1-800-Red Cross, or you can also text a $10 donation to the Red Cross at 90999.

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