Knoxville mom wants to stop kids from using club drug 'Molly'

Knoxville mom wants to stop kids from using club drug 'Molly'

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Sonya Napier knows all too well the affects of the drug. Her daughter went from being the girl next door to someone she didn't recognize. Sonya Napier knows all too well the affects of the drug. Her daughter went from being the girl next door to someone she didn't recognize.
"During that time, you know, I didn't care about my family, obviously if I was stealing from my own mother. I didn't care about my friends," "Jenny" said. "During that time, you know, I didn't care about my family, obviously if I was stealing from my own mother. I didn't care about my friends," "Jenny" said.

By TEARSA SMITH
6 News Anchor/Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - Chances are you have heard about the club drug ecstasy. Lately, it seems like its stronger version called "Molly" is the new catch phrase in pop and rap music. The entertainers promise good times and wild nights ahead.

It's a simple name, but a not-so-simple club drug. Molly is short for molecule, and is the pure form of ecstasy. It's powerful and could lead to sleep deprivation, paranoia and blurred vision.

That's not enough to stop lots of young people from partying with Molly, and one Knoxville mom is saying "Enough."

Gone are the days of the music being enough to keep the party alive. For more than a decade, Molly or MDMA has been the drug of choice for the rave and party crowd, but it seems the drug has made its way into more mainstream music.

Just turn on your radio. From pop artists like Miley Cyrus to rap artists like Tyga, the airwaves are filled with lyrics about Molly.

Parents are fighting the message from entertainers that Molly is no big deal.

"The rebellion and things like that didn't really happen, until she turned 18 and was exposed to things outside the home that I had no idea was even existing," said Sonya Napier.

She knows all too well the affects of the drug. Her daughter went from being the girl next door to someone she didn't recognize.

"I started noticing my bank account missing hundreds of dollars, and you know I couldn't remember, why did I go to Weigels and take out 60 or 80 dollars. And then I realized it wasn't me," she said.

Sonya's daughter, we'll call her "Jenny," asked that we keep her identity hidden because she is getting her life back in order. She says it's been a long and tough road.

"During that time, you know, I didn't care about my family, obviously if I was stealing from my own mother. I didn't care about my friends," Jenny said.

She says in the beginning, she would try Molly while out partying.

"It made you feel happy. It makes you feel like you enjoy the music so much better," Jenny said.

Those feelings came at a price.

Once considered a model child, who even grew up serving in youth groups at church, Jenny was kicked out of her home. It was a tough love move by her mother.

Sonya even tried taking her daughter to a rehab center.

"We drove to Chattanooga a year ago, and she cursed me every mile of the way. And I was just on a mission. We're going. You're going to do this. You are going to get better. I want my daughter back," said Sonya.

The Knoxville Metropolitan Drug Commission keeps tabs on the use of drugs in our schools, and Molly or MDMA does come up as an abused drug, but there is hope that the number remains low.

"So we hear, it's one of the hot drugs," said Heather Sutton, spokesperson for the commission. "According to our local survey that we do in the schools, since 2007, use of MDMA has increased a little bit from right around 5 percent to around 7 percent in this last survey."

That doesn't account for the college age crowd.

Sonya wants to keep as many parents off the path her family has endured.

"People have said 'Why are you even doing this? Aren't you embarrassed?' Because I don't want someone else to have to go down this road. If one person sees this and makes a choice not to start taking Molly or other drugs."

Jenny says she suffers from memory loss. She and her mother have come a long way, but they still have a long way to go to rebuild the trust and the relationship they lost.

Jenny says she's been sober for six months now and is even thinking about going to school.

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