More people and grocery store shelves going gluten-free

More people and grocery store shelves going gluten-free

Posted:
More grocery stores are stocking their shelves with gluten free foods, which are foods that don't contain wheat, barley, or rye, and sometimes, oats. More grocery stores are stocking their shelves with gluten free foods, which are foods that don't contain wheat, barley, or rye, and sometimes, oats.
Brittany Cole scans labels to see that the foods she buys don't contain gluten. She cut it out of her diet four years ago. Brittany Cole scans labels to see that the foods she buys don't contain gluten. She cut it out of her diet four years ago.
"My joints don't swell. I don't have the acid reflux problems at all like I used to, don't have stomach ulcer issues," Brittany Cole said. "My joints don't swell. I don't have the acid reflux problems at all like I used to, don't have stomach ulcer issues," Brittany Cole said.
Some studies show a lot of people can be sensitive to gluten without having full blown Celiac disease. Some studies show a lot of people can be sensitive to gluten without having full blown Celiac disease.
Clinical dietitian Nicole Colella of Parkwest Medical Center says if you want to be gluten-free, don't just stick to processed foods. Have a well-rounded diet. Clinical dietitian Nicole Colella of Parkwest Medical Center says if you want to be gluten-free, don't just stick to processed foods. Have a well-rounded diet.

By LORI TUCKER
6 News Anchor/Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - More grocery stores are stocking their shelves with gluten free foods, which are foods that don't contain wheat, barley, or rye, and sometimes, oats.

Yet studies show only one percent of the U.S. population has a condition that makes them sick if they eat those things.

Celiac disease is a condition that damages the lining of the small intestine when a person eats foods containing gluten.

Current estimates show more than 1.5 million people who haven't been diagnosed with Celiac embrace the gluten free way.

There may be reasons for that beyond following a fad.

Local personal trainer Brittney Cole of Adaptive Fitness Warehouse makes sure she carves out time for each trip to the grocery store.

She scans labels to see that the foods she buys don't contain gluten. She cut it out of her diet four years ago.

"My acid reflux was terrible, stomach ulcers were terrible, my arthritis was terrible. Everything was just off," she said.

Brittney doesn't have Celiac disease, but passes over traditional breads and other items loaded with wheat, rye, or barley.

She seeks out stores like Kroger, which stocks alternatives like gluten-free bread, pasta, cereal, and granola, to name a few.

All are marked certified gluten-free on the label, and on the shelf.

For some reason, she feels better these days.

"My joints don't swell. I don't have the acid reflux problems at all like I used to, don't have stomach ulcer issues," she said.

She is not alone.

Some studies show a lot of people can be sensitive to gluten without having full blown Celiac disease.

Clinical dietitian Nicole Colella of Parkwest Medical Center says if you want to be gluten-free, don't just stick to processed foods. Have a well-rounded diet.

"Do your research," Colella said. "Find the foods that you like, that you can tolerate, but definitely always include your fruits and vegetables , whole grains when you can, quinoa and brown rice, things like that."

While gluten itself doesn't have specific nutritional benefits, many of the whole grains containing it do.

"Any kind of enriched flour that's used in a product is going to be coming from the wheat plant and those are all enriched with thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid, which are all your B vitamins," explained Colella.

Just because something is gluten free doesn't mean it's low-calorie. Often, it's quite the opposite.

It's something Brittney knows all too well.

"I have to make a conscientious decision to understand that one cookie's going to have more calories in it than if I were just going to go home and bake some normal ones, but it's not worth me being sick for the normal cookies."

Some say the Green Revolution may be partly to blame for gluten sensitivity.

In the 1950s, scientists began cross-breeding wheat to make shorter, stronger plants.

It helped wheat harvests, but the gluten in wheat may have been altered, becoming a problem for more people.

Powered by WorldNow

1306 N. Broadway NE Knoxville,
Tennessee 37917

Telephone: 865.637.NEWS(6397)
Fax: 865.525.4091
Email: newsroom@wate.com

Can’t find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Young Broadcasting of Knoxville, Inc. A Media General Company.