Woman warns of charity that claims to help families of police

Sevier County woman warns of charity that claims to help families of police officers

Posted:
The Police Protective Fund sent Cathy Parker a brochure about its services claiming to collect money for families of fallen police officers. The non-profit first called Parker. The Police Protective Fund sent Cathy Parker a brochure about its services claiming to collect money for families of fallen police officers. The non-profit first called Parker.
"So I looked up the number that is right here, the 877 number. It came up as a scam," Cathy Parker said. "I typed it in Google. It said do not send to these people. It's a scam." "So I looked up the number that is right here, the 877 number. It came up as a scam," Cathy Parker said. "I typed it in Google. It said do not send to these people. It's a scam."
Charity Navigator, a national watchdog group, show 91 percent of the donations taken in by this organization go to administrative and fundraising cost. Only eight percent is used to help people. Charity Navigator, a national watchdog group, show 91 percent of the donations taken in by this organization go to administrative and fundraising cost. Only eight percent is used to help people.

By DON DARE
6 On Your Side Consumer Investigator

SEVIERVILLE (WATE) - It is that time of the year when charitable organizations start calling asking for donations, but a woman in Sevier County is urging people to steer clear of a charity that supposedly helps families of police officers.

The Police Protective Fund that contacted Cathy Parker has been around for more than a decade.

The charity sent Parker a brochure about its services claiming to collect money for families of fallen police officers. The non-profit first called Parker.

"He said it's for police families whose husband or wife has been killed while on duty," said Parker. "And they wanted me to donate to them, and they wanted my credit card number. I said I don't give my credit card number over the phone."

Apparently, the telemarketer didn't take "no" for an answer, so they called back eight times at all times of the day.

"One morning they called me at 8:30 on a Saturday. [They also called] around noon, one o'clock, two o'clock. Sometimes seven o'clock at night," she said.

Parker says their persistence became annoying.

"So I looked up the number that is right here, the 877 number. It came up as a scam," she said. "I typed it in Google. It said do not send to these people. It's a scam."

The Police Protective Fund is a legitimate charitable organization, but when we checked with Charity Navigator, a national watchdog group, 91 percent of the donations taken in by this organization go to administrative and fundraising cost.

Only eight percent is used to help people.

"It doesn't go to the wives or husbands that are left behind," explained Parker.

6 On Your Side talked with Jerry Tipton at the Better Business Bureau.

"Sixty-five percent of the funds should go to the cause. No more than 35 percent should go to administrative," said Tipton.

Tipton says a charity that shows only eight percent of the money collected goes to the cause doesn't come close to meeting any kind of standard.

While many out of state charitable organizations will be calling during the holiday period, the best advice may be to stay local. Only give to charities you know and trust.

Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and WATE. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.