What's the right protocol at a pet crematory?

What's the right protocol at a pet crematory?

Posted:
For 13 years Carolyn Yeargan has been helping grieving pet owners find peace by running a crematory. For 13 years Carolyn Yeargan has been helping grieving pet owners find peace by running a crematory.
To make sure Yeargan Pet Cremation is doing things the right way, they're inspected by the Environmental Protection Agency or EPA. To make sure Yeargan Pet Cremation is doing things the right way, they're inspected by the Environmental Protection Agency or EPA.

By LAURA HALM
6 News Reporter

LENOIR CITY (WATE) - The investigation into a Morgan County pet crematory has a lot of people asking questions

Two local pet crematories, Grandview Pet Services and Yeargan Pet Crematory, showed us their method and say they cremate one animal at a time.

For 13 years, Carolyn Yeargan has been helping grieving pet owners find peace by running a crematory. Customers have brought her their pet goldfish, snakes, as well as cats and dogs.

"Well, when we get a pet for a short period of time they become ours, we just can't take them out and run around and play with them. We can say the prayer and give them that gentle little push back to God," said Yeargan who owns Yeargan Pet Crematory.

She says her priority is to show both the pet and their owner care and respect.

"You do one pet at a time and when the cool down period is through you take those ashes out and you process them, you put them in a little container with a bag, and the name tag so you know exactly what pet you've got," she added.

To make sure Yeargan Pet Cremation is doing things the right way, they're inspected by the Environmental Protection Agency or EPA.

"They might come twice a year, they might come once a year. They just announce that they're here and there you go. So it has to be right when they show up," added Yeargan.

She showed us the difference between ashes before and after they've been processed. Yeargan says once the cremation is done, all ashes look just alike.

Yeargen says each pet is special and that's why she says a prayer before she starts the crematory.

"Heavenly Father, creator of all things, thank you for having entrusted with us a loyal pet," she said.

Some pet owners do not want the ashes returned to them. In those cases, the animal is put into a "group cremation," where the ashes are taken to a private farm to be scattered.

Powered by WorldNow

1306 N. Broadway NE Knoxville,
Tennessee 37917

Telephone: 865.637.NEWS(6397)
Fax: 865.525.4091
Email: newsroom@wate.com

Can’t find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Young Broadcasting of Knoxville, Inc. A Media General Company.