German Shepherd helps Knoxville rehab patients

German Shepherd helps Knoxville rehab patients

Posted:
Four-and-a-half-year-old Ransom is a German Shepherd who is doing more than spreading cheer to patients at Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center. Four-and-a-half-year-old Ransom is a German Shepherd who is doing more than spreading cheer to patients at Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center.
"He loves the attention so it's good for both of them," said Ransom's Owner, KPD Officer Jason Artimovich. "He loves the attention so it's good for both of them," said Ransom's Owner, KPD Officer Jason Artimovich.
Anna is a patient who has suffered strokes and was having trouble putting words in the correct order.  However when Ransom stopped by, she was able to say his name in a complete sentence. Anna is a patient who has suffered strokes and was having trouble putting words in the correct order. However when Ransom stopped by, she was able to say his name in a complete sentence.
Recreational therapist Ashley Hamilton says pets like Ransom help take away the pressure of "getting it right." Recreational therapist Ashley Hamilton says pets like Ransom help take away the pressure of "getting it right."

By LORI TUCKER
6 News Anchor/Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - Four-and-a-half-year-old Ransom is a German Shepherd who is doing more than spreading cheer to patients at Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center.

He's also providing his own method of therapy, with some pretty impressive results.

Ransom's owner is also a patrol officer with the Knoxville Police Department. Officer Jason Artimovich spends several hours of his own time each week at Patricia Neal letting Ransom help patients in his own way.

"He loves the attention so it's good for both of them," said Artimovich.

Anna is a patient who has suffered strokes and was having trouble putting words in the correct order.

However when Ransom stopped by, she was able to say his name in a complete sentence. "Well, hello there, Ransom," she said. "How's Ransom? Aw, how sweet."

Recreational therapist Ashley Hamilton says pets like Ransom help take away the pressure of "getting it right."

"It just provides a totally different environment for healing," Hamilton explained.

Ransom is part of the HABIT program run by the University of Tennessee School of Veterinary Medicine, placing pets not only in rehab centers and hospitals, but other areas where they'd be a good fit.

HABIT stands for "Human and Animal Bond in Tennessee."

If you'd like to see if your pet would qualify for the program, you can visit their website.

HABIT is also on Facebook and Pinterest.

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