Kingston woman served eviction notice due to young granddaughter

Kingston woman served eviction notice due to 3-year-old granddaughter

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Susan Quiett loves her granddaughter Kiley. She's had unofficial temporary custody of the 3-year-old since mid-October. Susan Quiett loves her granddaughter Kiley. She's had unofficial temporary custody of the 3-year-old since mid-October.
"You are hereby given 30 days to vacate the unit," said Quiett as she read her eviction notice, which arrived on December 2. "You are hereby given 30 days to vacate the unit," said Quiett as she read her eviction notice, which arrived on December 2.
"Until I can get on my feet, I would rather my child be with my mother. She's a good strong female role model," said Mac Hensley. "Until I can get on my feet, I would rather my child be with my mother. She's a good strong female role model," said Mac Hensley.
"They decided to let Kiley stay month-to-month. I'm very thankful that now we can relax for Christmas and know we'll be here and celebrate Christmas instead of packing up," said Susan Quiett. "They decided to let Kiley stay month-to-month. I'm very thankful that now we can relax for Christmas and know we'll be here and celebrate Christmas instead of packing up," said Susan Quiett.

By DON DARE
6 On Your Side Consumer Investigator

KINGSTON (WATE) - If you live in government housing there are strict rules you have to follow. A woman in Kingston received an eviction notice because her 3-year old granddaughter lives with her in a government subsidized apartment.

The circumstances are somewhat complicated. Rules for apartments subsidized by HUD, Housing and Urban Development, say visitors can only stay overnight for a short time.

Two weeks is the limit. If they stay longer, the renter is in violation of the lease.

A little girl has lived with her nana now for two months, and both were about to be kicked out until Monday afternoon.

Susan Quiett loves her granddaughter Kiley. She's had unofficial temporary custody of the 3-year-old since mid-October.

Mrs. Quiett faces a crisis. After the new year, neither she nor Kiley will have a place to live.

"You are hereby given 30 days to vacate the unit," said Quiett as she read her eviction notice, which arrived on December 2.

Mrs. Quiett, who lives on a small fixed income, will have to leave her government subsidized apartment in Kingston on January 2.

"I'd like to see them leave me alone and let me live here in peace," said Quiett.

Quiett has been taking care of Kiley at her apartment since mid-October. She also took care of Kiley for a time earlier this year. The reason is Susan's son Mac Hensley lives at a homeless shelter in Knoxville. He can't keep steady work due to a disability.

So. Mac left Kiley with his mother. The child's mother who lives in Florida has not been part of her life since shortly after her birth.

"Until I can get on my feet, I would rather my child be with my mother. She's a good strong female role model. I'd rather her be with Mom than out here where I'm at right now, [which is] on the street," said Hensley.

Unless something changes, Quiett herself will soon be homeless.

"They gave me seven more days. We're going week to week with this," she said.

Since late October, Quiett was warned twice by apartment management that guests cannot stay any longer than two weeks. Twice, she defied the warning.

"I can't put her out on the streets because she is three years old. And her daddy is in a  homeless shelter, and he can't take her there," she said.

The eviction notice states Quiett is violating section 13 of her lease. It states the apartment is meant for her alone; she must get written approval for anyone else to live there permanently.

"Every time she has been here, I have had verbal permission," she said. "I didn't know I had to have it in writing."

Quiett's son, Mac Hensley is looking for a place to stay, but said he doesn't have enough money saved up yet, and his health isn't good enough to keep a steady job. 

6 On Your Side went to speak to the apartment manager at Lakewood village, but she was out of the office. So we contacted the regional Housing and Urban Development office.

HUD told 6 on Your Side the apartment's management does not want to evict Quiett and the little girl.

However, since the child's name is not on the lease, they must apply the same rules and regulations to all residents. 

HUD suggested to Quiett that she contact legal aid and seek temporary custody of Kiley so that both can stay in the apartment.

Quiett met with HUD, the apartment manager and legal aid from Oak Ridge Monday at noon.

"They decided to let Kiley stay month-to-month. I'm very thankful that now we can relax for Christmas and know we'll be here and celebrate Christmas instead of packing up," said Quiett.

Quiett is working closely with the Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands based in Oak Ridge.

Legal aid is trying to see if Kiley can be put on Quiett's lease once she receives temporary legal custody of her granddaughter.

Quiett says she is thankful for legal aid and their assistance.

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