2013 makes top 5 wettest years in Knoxville recorded history

2013 makes top 5 wettest years in Knoxville recorded history

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Knoxville saw record rainfall in 2013, landing one of the top five spots for the wettest years ever in recorded history. Knoxville saw record rainfall in 2013, landing one of the top five spots for the wettest years ever in recorded history.
"The more rainfall you have and cooler waters, then certain types of fish will move out and come back in," Billy Dunn said. "That puts their spawning time off." "The more rainfall you have and cooler waters, then certain types of fish will move out and come back in," Billy Dunn said. "That puts their spawning time off."
"When we get that extra rainfall, we do have to spill that through spillways," James Everett with TVA said. "When we get that extra rainfall, we do have to spill that through spillways," James Everett with TVA said.

By SAMANTHA MANNING
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - Knoxville saw record rainfall in 2013, landing one of the top five spots for the wettest years ever in recorded history.

According to the National Weather Service, the wettest year in Knoxville was 1875 at almost 74 inches of rain.

So far in 2013, Knoxville has had almost 68 inches. Tennessee Valley Authority said that is about 14 inches above the yearly average.

The year started out extremely wet, with January seeing the most rainfall this year at more than 12 inches for the month.

All that rainfall is making a noticeable difference for fishermen at dams like Fort Loudoun.

"It's pretty slow," Madisonville resident Billy Dunn said.

Dunn has been fishing at Fort Loudoun Dam for more than 20 years and said he has never come up as empty handed while fishing as he has over the last 12 months.

"The more rainfall you have and cooler waters, then certain types of fish will move out and come back in," Dunn said. "That puts their spawning time off."

TVA said despite the heavy rainfall, no areas under its watch are at risk of flooding at this point.

The agency has had to increase its spilling amount this year because of the heavy rains.

"When we get that extra rainfall, we do have to spill that through spillways," James Everett with TVA said. "We do that in a controlled manner by opening gates and releasing the water at a controlled rate."

Dunn said that spilling is hurting the fishing scene.

"The last couple years, I have hardly seen people I know bring anything out of here," Dunn said.

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