Book raises awareness of SIDS for new parents

Book raises awareness of SIDS for new parents

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Starting this year, every mother who gives birth at a Tennessee hospital will receive a book that helps parents remember the do's and don'ts of safe sleep. Starting this year, every mother who gives birth at a Tennessee hospital will receive a book that helps parents remember the do's and don'ts of safe sleep.
Dr. Schmid is a neonatal specialist at UT Medical Center and he agrees with the new book's message. He hopes giving the book to new mothers will make them aware of the importance of being aware of SIDS. Dr. Schmid is a neonatal specialist at UT Medical Center and he agrees with the new book's message. He hopes giving the book to new mothers will make them aware of the importance of being aware of SIDS.

By Mike Krafcik
WATE 6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) -  State health officials are trying a new way to promote safe sleep for newborn babies.        

Starting this year, every mother who gives birth at a Tennessee hospital will receive a book that helps parents remember the do's and don'ts of safe sleep.  

A Kentucky-based foundation is helping to bring  more than 80,000 copies of  "Sleep Baby Safe and Snug" to every parent of a newborn at the 80 hospitals delivering babies in Tennessee.

Cincinnati pediatrician Doctor James Schmid wrote a book titled "Lessons Learned" after his son suffered sudden infant death syndrome, known as SIDS, while sleeping on his stomach.      

Dr. Schmid is a neonatal specialist at UT Medical Center and he agrees with the new book's message. He hopes giving the book to new mothers will make them aware of the importance of being aware of SIDS.

The book's valuable tips include the ABCs of sleeping babies. It says they should sleep alone, on their back, and in a crib.              

Dr. Schmid says babies that sleep in the bed with other parents are at higher risk of accidents and SIDS death.      

Last year, 121 Tennessee infants died in unsafe sleep conditions, which is the third-most common cause of death. According to Dr. Schmid, infants that between one to three months old and are otherwise normal babies.

The state health department began a Safe Sleep Campaign in 2012 as part of a broad effort to reduce Tennessee's infant mortality rate, which remains among the highest in the nation.      

Kentucky-based Charlie's Kids Foundation helped to launch the book here in Tennessee.

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