A rule in wine in grocery stores bill could keep some shoppers w

A rule in wine in grocery stores bill could keep some shoppers waiting

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"We chose here because we were next to a grocery store," said owner Ryan McElveen. "We chose here because we were next to a grocery store," said owner Ryan McElveen.
If a grocery store and liquor store are within 500-feet of each other there could be an additional delay putting wine on the shelves, that's if they cannot come to some kind of an agreement. If a grocery store and liquor store are within 500-feet of each other there could be an additional delay putting wine on the shelves, that's if they cannot come to some kind of an agreement.
"I love that one-on-one contact and that's so important now a days. Everything is just so fast," said Debra Mahony visiting Knoxville from Missouri. "I love that one-on-one contact and that's so important now a days. Everything is just so fast," said Debra Mahony visiting Knoxville from Missouri.

By LAURA HALM
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - How much longer will we wait to see Merlot or Riesling in stores like Food City? Last week, the Senate approved an amended bill which would allow wine to be sold in grocery stores. Though, even if it finally passes some people will have to wait.

There's a rule in this amended bill and it all breaks down to distance: how far away is a liquor store from a grocery store? It calls for compromise but if neither one agrees, shoppers will keep waiting.

Hundreds of bottles of wine are stocked at Corks in Farragut with selections from Tennessee to Tasmania.

"We chose here because we were next to a grocery store," said owner Ryan McElveen.

Tennessee lawmakers recently getting closer to making wine in grocery stores bill into law. "We would lose a lot of revenue," added McElveen.

Though there is an amendment proposed: If a grocery store and liquor store are within 500-feet of each other there could be an additional delay putting wine on the shelves, that's if they cannot come to some kind of an agreement. Essentially no wine could be sold at that grocery store and no items, like high gravity beer or chips, could be sold at that liquor store for a year or until July 1, 2017.

"We would rather wait for an additional year and prevent them from selling wine," said McElveen who says the reason why would be to give his business more time to prepare a new business model.

We wanted to map out how many businesses this rule may impact here in Knoxville. McElveen believes Corks is roughly 80-100 feet from Publix. We measured from Bob's Package Store to Trader Joe's and found there was 273-feet in distance. Over at Toddy's Liquor and Wine we found 495-feet was between the store and Kroger.

A Kroger spokesperson told us it would be to both parties an advantage trying to come to an agreement so that both could move forward without delaying implementation time.

But when it comes down to it, some shoppers say no changes should be made. "I love that one-on-one contact and that's so important now a days. Everything is just so fast," said Debra Mahony visiting Knoxville from Missouri.

While others say it's time for convenience and the decision to put wine on grocery store aisles is dragging.

"Yes or no? It's not a hard question," said resident Terry Wright.

Other liquor stores 6 News reached out to say any decision is a long way off, while others are willing to compromise but they don't have the room to sell added items.

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