New test tells parents the gender of their baby in early pregnan

New test tells parents the gender of their baby in early pregnancy

Posted:
Crystal Sellers of Knoxville is almost 20 weeks pregnant. She and her husband Ben got a good look at the baby through ultrasound. Crystal Sellers of Knoxville is almost 20 weeks pregnant. She and her husband Ben got a good look at the baby through ultrasound.
Normally, ultrasound will reveal the gender of the child about 16 weeks into the mother's pregnancy, but the Sellers have known they're having a little boy since she was only 13 weeks along. Normally, ultrasound will reveal the gender of the child about 16 weeks into the mother's pregnancy, but the Sellers have known they're having a little boy since she was only 13 weeks along.
The test, called the Panorama, checks for three major chromosomes responsible for most chromosomal abnormalities. It can also tell gender. The test, called the Panorama, checks for three major chromosomes responsible for most chromosomal abnormalities. It can also tell gender.
"As I discussed with my doctor, every year that we wait the chances are one in fifty, two in fifty, three in fifty of having Down Syndrome or some sort of chromosome abnormality," said Crystal Sellers. "As I discussed with my doctor, every year that we wait the chances are one in fifty, two in fifty, three in fifty of having Down Syndrome or some sort of chromosome abnormality," said Crystal Sellers.
"There are some other more unusual chromosomal abnormalities that will show up, but by far the most common one is Down Syndrome," said women's health specialist Dr. Leonard Brabson. "There are some other more unusual chromosomal abnormalities that will show up, but by far the most common one is Down Syndrome," said women's health specialist Dr. Leonard Brabson.

By LORI TUCKER
6 News Anchor/Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - A new non-invasive test can let parents know the gender of their baby in the early weeks of pregnancy. It can also detect chromosome abnormalities like Down Syndrome.

Some, however, see the test as controversial.

Crystal Sellers of Knoxville is almost 20 weeks pregnant. She and her husband Ben got a good look at the baby through ultrasound.

Normally, ultrasound will reveal the gender of the child about 16 weeks into the mother's pregnancy, but the Sellers have known they're having a little boy since she was only 13 weeks along.

It was because of to a new blood test that detects fetal DNA in the mother's blood. Revealing gender is a bonus.

The test, called the Panorama, checks for three major chromosomes responsible for most chromosomal abnormalities.

"There are some other more unusual chromosomal abnormalities that will show up, but by far the most common one is Down Syndrome," said women's health specialist Dr. Leonard Brabson.

Ben and Crystal Sellers already have one healthy little boy, 19-month-old Cole. The test eased their minds about the health of their new baby.

"As I discussed with my doctor, every year that we wait the chances are one in fifty, two in fifty, three in fifty of having Down Syndrome or some sort of chromosome abnormality," said Crystal.

Until the non-invasive blood test, the only way to check for these types of problems was by amniocentesis and other tests that could put the mother and baby at risk.

Studies show the tests have a high accuracy rate, which leads some to questions whether it could lead to a higher abortion rate over the gender or genetics.

"I haven't really had that situation show itself. I'm sure there are people who might consider it for that reason, but I haven't seen it myself," said Dr. Brabson.

Finding out early that a new little boy is on the way was helpful in planning minor changes to the Sellers' existing nursery, and in letting family in on the good news during the holidays.

The test costs $250, but the price is expected to come down once it becomes more widely used.

Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and WATE. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.