Knoxville grandfather wants to warn others about Facebook scam

Knoxville grandfather wants to warn others about Facebook scam

Posted:
Jim Dyer has a Facebook account on which he keeps up to date with the goings and comings of his four grandchildren. Jim Dyer has a Facebook account on which he keeps up to date with the goings and comings of his four grandchildren.
The other day he got this request from Paulette, a person he didn't know. The other day he got this request from Paulette, a person he didn't know.
He was told he had won a Facebook contest and needed to send money to receive his prize. He was told he had won a Facebook contest and needed to send money to receive his prize.
"I'm afraid somebody will get caught up in this. This is the first time I have ever seen anything on Facebook like this," said Jim Dyer. "I'm afraid somebody will get caught up in this. This is the first time I have ever seen anything on Facebook like this," said Jim Dyer.

By DON DARE
6 On Your Side Consumer Investigator

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - Internet scammers are increasingly using Facebook as an effective vehicle to connect with potential victims.

6 On Your Side talked with a Knoxville grandfather who was surprised when he received a hoax message after he had responded to a friend request.

Here's a question: do you really know all of your Facebook friends? If you accept only real friends, you'd likely be immune to this scam.

However, you could fall victim if you accept loosely connected friends, friends of friends, or anyone that you don't know well.

Retired auto dealer service manager Jim Dyer has two daughters who live out of state.

Dyer has a Facebook account on which he keeps up to date with the goings and comings of his four grandchildren.

The other day he got this request from Paulette, a person he didn't know.

"I received a friend request from a lady in California. So I answered it to see what she wanted," Dyer said.

After the fact, Jim realized he should have ignored the request, but out of curiosity he friended her and got a surprise response. He was told he won $350,000 in a Facebook lottery.

"I said, 'Well, my ship has come in,'" he said, laughing. "I can use $350,000."

The woman claimed she works for Facebook. Jim knew that was a lie, but he decided to go along with the stream of messages.

"I told them I was broke. I had to borrow the money. I just played their little game," he said.

Dyer said eventually Paulette gave up on him, but then a new friend came along.

"Susan Alex wants to be friends on Facebook," read Dyer. "I friended her."

Susan told Dyer he had won $900,000, but there was a catch.

"I have got to send them a check for $550 or give then a visa ATM card for $450," he said.

Dyer never sent any money to the bogus set of messages.

6 on your side contacted Facebook. Matt Steinfeld wrote: "Facebook takes security very seriously and has teams that focus on fighting cyber crime and protecting people's accounts. If you receive a post or message that tries to trick you into sending money, report it immediately to Facebook."

"I'm afraid somebody will get caught up in this. This is the first time I have ever seen anything on Facebook like this," said Dyer.

He said his main concern was young people who use Facebook who might fall for the scam.

"[They could] get ahold of their dad's credit card and send a bunch of money out, he said. "And not aware of doing the wrong thing. Because Dad won't mind when I get that big check."

Facebook says while only a small number of people have experienced the type of scam Jim Dyer faced, Facebook encourages its users to become a fan of the Facebook Security page and report any suspicious activity to Facebook's help center.

Powered by WorldNow

1306 N. Broadway NE Knoxville,
Tennessee 37917

Telephone: 865.637.NEWS(6397)
Fax: 865.525.4091
Email: newsroom@wate.com

Can’t find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Young Broadcasting of Knoxville, Inc. A Media General Company.