Would TN proposed Daylight Saving Time bill impact everyday life

Would Tenn. proposed Daylight Saving Time bill impact everyday life?

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"So your favorite show that comes on at 8 p.m. would actually be on at 9 p.m. here, that would definitely be an adjustment." "So your favorite show that comes on at 8 p.m. would actually be on at 9 p.m. here, that would definitely be an adjustment."
Doctor Dewey McWhirter studies sleep, and he says when we spring forward and fall back each year we become sleep deprived. Doctor Dewey McWhirter studies sleep, and he says when we spring forward and fall back each year we become sleep deprived.
If this bill passes it means we would spring forward this March and then we would never again change time. If this bill passes it means we would spring forward this March and then we would never again change time.

By LAURA HALM
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - Spring forward and fall back, it's a routine we're all familiar with having to change our clocks. Now lawmakers in Tennessee want to break tradition by creating a more consistent time setting overall.

If this bill passes it means we would spring forward this March and then we would never again change time. Essentially when the rest of the country turns their clocks back in this fall we would be one hour ahead of them. That means we would be one hour ahead of Eastern time for about four months out of the year.

Seconds, minutes, hours always racing, but time seems to stand still when we're cozied up in bed sleeping. Doctor Dewey McWhirter studies sleep, and he says when we spring forward and fall back each year we become sleep deprived.

Doctor McWhirter believes this proposed bill where we never change our clocks won't hurt our shuteye saying, "Time is sort of an artificial factor that we put on top of everything. So when we have this time restraint then yeah you kind of get used to a schedule that's based on the time restraint. But light plays such a factor with it also that I think people would really adjust to it fairly well."

But what about what's on TV?

"So your favorite show that comes on at 8 p.m. would actually be on at 9 p.m. here, that would definitely be an adjustment. An even greater adjustment is when you're used to watching your 11 p.m. news and you'll be waiting until midnight for your local newscast to come on," said WATE Programming Director Melanie Morris.

Remember though, if this bill passes, that's the case only four months out of the year, and thanks to alternatives like DVR or On Demand it may just be a headache.

"There's an adjustment. It's not impossible but it's certainly an inconvenience," added Morris.

Some East Tennesseans say this move is simply a good idea and should have happened sooner.

"With the extra daylight hours early, I think that's a plus for everyone and when school is in session I think it would be a good thing for that," said Chuck Patterson.

While others like Shannon Smith say it's just a bad idea.

"I think we just need to leave it alone."

Investment and financial experts 6 News spoke with say a change in Daylight Saving Time would not affect their business. They say regardless of which time zone they're in, they always do business based on New York time.

If the Daylight Saving Time bill passes, the change would take effect this July.

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