Automated CPR device saving lives in East Tennessee

Automated CPR device saving lives in East Tennessee

Posted:
The breakthrough technology, already available in East Tennessee, is called an automated Lucas CPR device. The breakthrough technology, already available in East Tennessee, is called an automated Lucas CPR device.
"When we don't have this device, people change hands because people get tired," said Dr. Braxton. "When we don't have this device, people change hands because people get tired," said Dr. Braxton.
The device is attached to a stabilizing board under the patient. A suction cup is then snapped into place over the patient's chest. The "on" switch is activated, and consistent compressions begin. The device is attached to a stabilizing board under the patient. A suction cup is then snapped into place over the patient's chest. The "on" switch is activated, and consistent compressions begin.

By LORI TUCKER
6 News Anchor/Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - A new device could one day change the way CPR is administered, and experts say it's already saving lives.

The breakthrough technology, already available in East Tennessee, is called an automated Lucas CPR device.

6 News went to Parkwest Medical Center to find out how it works.

Using a mannequin, the device is attached to a stabilizing board under the patient. A suction cup is then snapped into place over the patient's chest. The "on" switch is activated, and consistent compressions begin.

Dr. Brian Braxton of Parkwest's Emergency Department says at first he was skeptical, but while it's too early to have data to support it yet here, he says people who may not have lived are surviving.

"Some walk out of the hospital after using it," Dr. Braxton said.

Uninterrupted compression is the key, keeping blood flowing to the heart, unlike human interaction.

"When we don't have this device, people change hands because people get tired," said Dr. Braxton.

That slows the entire process, which can have an impact on the patient.

Right now, these devices are in every first responder unit for Rural/Metro ambulance service. Supporters say they hope one day they'll be in every hospital.

Parkwest has one unit; it may purchase two.

This doesn't take the place of traditional CPR. It's still critical to know how to do it in order to save a life while waiting on emergency crews to arrive.

Many hospitals around the country are using automated CPR.

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