Lenoir City honors Medal of Honor recipient

Lenoir City honors Medal of Honor recipient

Posted:
It was a packed house at Lenoir City's National Guard Armory, all to recognize retired U.S. Army Sergeant Sammy Davis, awarded the Medal of Honor in 1968 for heroic acts during the Vietnam War. It was a packed house at Lenoir City's National Guard Armory, all to recognize retired U.S. Army Sergeant Sammy Davis, awarded the Medal of Honor in 1968 for heroic acts during the Vietnam War.
"It was just like living in a bad dream," said Davis. "If I don't do my job, those guys behind me don't have a chance." "It was just like living in a bad dream," said Davis. "If I don't do my job, those guys behind me don't have a chance."
Davis, who still insists he was just doing his job that night, passed the medal around the room Monday to let everyone see and hold it, as he spoke about what it stands for. Davis, who still insists he was just doing his job that night, passed the medal around the room Monday to let everyone see and hold it, as he spoke about what it stands for.

By HAYLEY HARMON
6 News Anchor/Reporter

LENOIR CITY (WATE) - One of the recipients of the American military's highest award, the Medal of Honor, made a stop in East Tennessee Monday for a breakfast held in his honor.

It was a packed house at Lenoir City's National Guard Armory, all to recognize retired U.S. Army Sergeant Sammy Davis, awarded the Medal of Honor in 1968 for heroic acts during the Vietnam War.

The audience got to hear Davis account of what happened the night he earned that award.

Serving as an artilleryman, Davis' battalion was attacked by around 1,500 Vietnamese soldiers the night of November 18, 1967.

"The mortars were just raining down," said Davis, 67, an Ohio native.

Even after he was gravely wounded, he fought on for hours, firing at the enemy with his machine gun and artillery piece.

"It was just like living in a bad dream," said Davis. "If I don't do my job, those guys behind me don't have a chance."

He then went on to rescue multiple other wounded soldier in the midst of ongoing battle.

By the time the Vietnamese finally fled, only 12 of the 42 members of Davis' battalion, Battery C, 2nd Battalion, 4th Artillery, 9th Infantry Division, were still alive.

Those surviving men nominated Davis for the Medal of Honor.

Davis, who still insists he was just doing his job that night, passed the medal around the room Monday to let everyone see and hold it, as he spoke about what it stands for.

"I didn't do anything heroic. I did my job. That's what soldiers do," said Davis. "You do for your brothers what you know they would do for you. I thank the man upstairs for giving me the strength and the courage to do my job for my brothers."

Sterling Global Operations, the company that hosted the breakfast, provides intelligence support for the US military all across the world.

Monday's breakfast kicked off their involvement with the Medal of Honor Convention, which is coming to Knoxville in September.

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