How to protect your plants from impending frost

How to protect your plants from impending frost

Posted:
"Do breathable fabrics," said Stanley. "Cotton, sheets, and towels." "Do breathable fabrics," said Stanley. "Cotton, sheets, and towels."
Not all plants need to be covered. Some flowering plants just need to be moved. Not all plants need to be covered. Some flowering plants just need to be moved.
The best bet though is to put a cardboard box over it to avoid damaging the plant. The best bet though is to put a cardboard box over it to avoid damaging the plant.

By DREW GARDNER
6 News Reporter

WATE (KNOXVILLE) - It finally seemed like old man winter was loosening his grip on East Tennessee, but now it seems he's making one last stand.

A hard frost is forecasted for Tuesday, threatening many vulnerable plants.

With temperatures in the 80's over the weekend, Stanley's Greenhouse was busy with customers eager to get their gardens planted, but with temperatures forecasted to plummet on Tuesday, you could be out a lot of money if you don't take the proper precautions .

"A lot of the plants that went out of here will be just fine. High 20s is alright to a lot of plants, but it's the things like the young tomato plants, sweet potato vine, basil that just doesn't like cold weather at all."

Lisa Stanley has been handing out advice to everyone purchasing the most vulnerable plants.

She says, If possible, you should bring those plants indoors. If they are already in the ground they will need to be covered, but avoid using plastic to cover your plants.

"Do breathable fabrics," said Stanley. "Cotton, sheets, and towels."

The best bet though is to put a cardboard box over it to avoid damaging the plant.

Not all plants need to be covered. Some flowering plants just need to be moved.

"If we could just give them a break from the cold, which would be like a car port, the front porch where there is overhead protection," said Stanley. 

Even though there may be snow in the forecast for parts of the area, Stanley says that's not necessarily a bad thing.

"Because it can snow at 35 or 34," said Stanley. "It's the temperatures under 25 and under 27 that can really be a problem."

It is Dogwood time in East Tennessee and that has some people especially concerned about this frost, but the experts at Stanley's say if the temperature stays above 24 degrees the Dogwoods and all other trees should be safe.

Click here for step-by-step instructions of how to cover your plants.

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