Madisonville mom raises awareness of pediatric strokes

Madisonville mom raises awareness of pediatric strokes

Posted:
The stroke, which Becky believes happened in utero, also affected Haven's ability to walk. She gets around well using a walker, but is also working hard to walk on her own with the help of leg braces and sheer determination. The stroke, which Becky believes happened in utero, also affected Haven's ability to walk. She gets around well using a walker, but is also working hard to walk on her own with the help of leg braces and sheer determination.
"We've been told that she's going to be walking. They say that's not going to be a problem," Becky said. "She will be independently walking, they are just not sure how long it's going to take her to get there." "We've been told that she's going to be walking. They say that's not going to be a problem," Becky said. "She will be independently walking, they are just not sure how long it's going to take her to get there."
"Neonatal stroke is a completed stroke, the baby's already had the damage done, and much of what's done afterwards is early intervention to maximize the child's abilities," Dr. Chris Miller said. "Neonatal stroke is a completed stroke, the baby's already had the damage done, and much of what's done afterwards is early intervention to maximize the child's abilities," Dr. Chris Miller said.
By LORI TUCKER
6 News Anchor/Reporter

MADISONVILLE (WATE) - When you hear about people who have a stroke, you probably think about someone who is in their 70's or 80's, but that's not always the case.

May is Pediatric Stroke Month, and a Madisonville mom reached out to 6 News to share the story of her 3-year-old daughter Haven.

It's in an effort to help other parents recognize the signs, because early intervention is critical.

Like many little girls her age, Haven loves to play tea party with her baby sister, and she couldn't wait to include us in the fun.

If you look closely, you can tell Haven doesn't use her left hand at all. Haven was born prematurely, weighing only a little over four pounds.

Even before she entered the world, ultrasound revealed some abnormalities in her brain. Haven's mom says the word "stroke" was never mentioned, but as time went on, she knew something was wrong.

"She was probably about five to six months old and we started noticing she wasn't using her left arm or kicking her left leg very much," said Becky Dockery Woods.

By the age of nine months, Haven still couldn't use her left side. Doctors finally said the symptoms were signs of a stroke.

Now, Haven's parents aren't just trying to help their child, they want to help others.

"We've been trying to find some way to raise awareness about it so more people are aware of what's going on, " Becky said.

Haven started weekly pool therapy and other rehab when she turned one, and goes to a special Pre-K program.

"She's learning more vocabulary," Becky said. "She's learning to count. She can count to 10 now. She's working on her colors."

Mom reinforces the work at home, helping Haven through play, trying to use her left hand as much as possible.

The stroke, which Becky believes happened in utero, also affected Haven's ability to walk. She gets around well using a walker, but is also working hard to walk on her own with the help of leg braces and sheer determination.

We got to witness Haven taking a few steps all by herself. It's something that gives her family hope for the future.

"We've been told that she's going to be walking. They say that's not going to be a problem," Becky said. "She will be independently walking, they are just not sure how long it's going to take her to get there."

We wanted to find out more about pediatric stroke, so we checked with Dr. Chris Miller, a neurologist with East Tennessee Children's Hospital. He says it's more common than you might think: 60 out of 100,000 births have a child with a stroke that develops in utero.

He says early intervention is critical.

"Neonatal stroke is a completed stroke, the baby's already had the damage done, and much of what's done afterwards is early intervention to maximize the child's abilities," Dr. Miller said.

Dr. Miller says sometimes stroke is discovered after the child is born, sometimes before. There are, he says, a variety of causes:
  • Problems with the placenta, not providing the infant with enough oxygen. Becky says this was the problem affecting her daughter.
  • Underlying congenital problem
  • Drug or alcohol use
Related links:

Powered by WorldNow

1306 N. Broadway NE Knoxville,
Tennessee 37917

Telephone: 865.637.NEWS(6397)
Fax: 865.525.4091
Email: newsroom@wate.com

Can’t find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Young Broadcasting of Knoxville, Inc. A Media General Company.