Local experts break down weather myths that may do you more harm

Local experts break down weather myths that may do you more harm

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So if you live in a mobile home too, Lawson says you should try going somewhere with a strong foundation. So if you live in a mobile home too, Lawson says you should try going somewhere with a strong foundation.
"Lowest floor of the building, the center of the building, small room, away from windows," added Lawson. "Lowest floor of the building, the center of the building, small room, away from windows," added Lawson.
"It's a little nerve-racking, scary, but hope everything goes well and we don't get hit," she said. "It's a little nerve-racking, scary, but hope everything goes well and we don't get hit," she said.
Knoxville, Tenn - By LAURA HALM
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - With threatening storms hitting East Tennessee recently, questions about what to do and how to stay safe have been flooding our newsroom from viewers. We caught up with experts to put to rest weather myths, that may do you more harm.

There's the belief tornadoes are more likely to strike out in the country than in the city, and that's just not so; you're just as vulnerable no matter where you live.

Tuesday afternoon, Kember Hasty was sweeping away branches and some brush left behind from a storm the night before.

"I was the only one who was awake so it was scary and kind of freaked me out a little bit," she said.

But really, that's how many are feeling, so what's fact and what's fiction when you see a tornado warning from our 6 Storm Team?

If you're driving, there's the belief the safest spot is under an overpass. We checked with Knoxville/Knox County EMA Director Alan Lawson who says that's not the case because debris flying around could hit you.

"If you want to stay in the car, get down low and get something over you or you can get outside the car and get into a ditch," said Lawson.

It also doesn't matter if you think one place in your home is safer than another, because bottom line is,  there's one spot to go when a tornado could touch down.

"Lowest floor of the building, the center of the building, small room, away from windows," added Lawson.

In Hasty's case she doesn't have a basement, "Our trailer isn't tied down and when we get really bad storms and you're in it you can feel it rock."

So if you live in a mobile home too, Lawson says you should try going somewhere with a strong foundation. But if there's isn't enough time Lawson says, "It's hard to accept but you're better off being outside in a ditch or a low lying area then you are inside the home."

It's Hasty's children, who call this place home, that she says she wants to protect.

"It's a little nerve-racking, scary, but hope everything goes well and we don't get hit," she said.

We also checked with our 6 Storm Team and learned straight line winds, which may not seem as threatening, can be just as dangerous as a tornado.
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