National Weather Service surveys Jellico storm damage

National Weather Service surveys Jellico storm damage

Posted:
The storms that moved through Monday afternoon left several buildings across Jellico heavily damaged, while others were left virtually untouched. Some buildings nearly collapsed, others with parts of their roof torn off. The storms that moved through Monday afternoon left several buildings across Jellico heavily damaged, while others were left virtually untouched. Some buildings nearly collapsed, others with parts of their roof torn off.
At Teddy Alsip's place it certainly looked like a tornado came through. Alsip lives in the hard hit Indian Mountain community. Luckily he and his wife were not home at the time. He learned about the storm by phone. At Teddy Alsip's place it certainly looked like a tornado came through. Alsip lives in the hard hit Indian Mountain community. Luckily he and his wife were not home at the time. He learned about the storm by phone.
While it wasn't the work of a tornado, the National Weather Service says this is a good reminder to review your safety plan for when the real thing hits. While it wasn't the work of a tornado, the National Weather Service says this is a good reminder to review your safety plan for when the real thing hits.
By DREW GARDNER
6 News Reporter

JELLICO (WATE) - The National Weather Service continues to survey the damage left behind by severe storms this week.

They were in Jellico Wednesday, where the first line of storms to hit East Tennessee came through.

Previous story: Wind rips off roof, traps Jellico woman inside car

The storms that moved through Monday afternoon left several buildings across Jellico heavily damaged, while others were left virtually untouched. Some buildings nearly collapsed, others with parts of their roof torn off.

Now it's up to Anthony Cavallucci with the National Weather Service to determine exactly what it was that caused the damage.

"The atmosphere on Monday afternoon certainly had the potential to be very tornadic," said Cavallucci.

At Teddy Alsip's place it certainly looked like a tornado came through. Alsip lives in the hard hit Indian Mountain community. Luckily he and his wife were not home at the time. He learned about the storm by phone.

"My neighbors did and said it destroyed the house and I needed to get home as fast as I could," said Alsip. "I couldn't even get here. I had to park half way down the road and walk. When I got here everything was gone."

The storm also picked up his pickup truck and dropped it several houses down. While the damage was bad the weather service ultimately determined the cause to be straight line winds.

"Anywhere from 80 mph up to 95 mph winds," said Cavallucci. "Very powerful winds. These were straight line thunderstorm wind damage that we had seen along the path."

While it wasn't the work of a tornado, the National Weather Service says this is a good reminder to review your safety plan for when the real thing hits.

More online: Complete National Weather Service storm survey

The Weather Service determined the same storm hit eastern Scott County,  but the worst of the damage stretched over a three mile path through Jellico.

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