Knoxville student helps save life with AED

Knoxville student helps save life with AED

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A Knoxville fifth grade student is being hailed a hero after his quick thinking helped save a man's life. It happened at First Baptist Concord during a basketball game Tuesday night. A Knoxville fifth grade student is being hailed a hero after his quick thinking helped save a man's life. It happened at First Baptist Concord during a basketball game Tuesday night.
Sebastian Borthwick, 10, actually learned about CPR and AEDs, or automated external defibrillators, in his computer class. Sebastian Borthwick, 10, actually learned about CPR and AEDs, or automated external defibrillators, in his computer class.
"The shock brought me back," said Charles Lewis, who was rushed to Turkey Creek Medical Center, where he had surgery and is now on the road to a full recovery. "The shock brought me back," said Charles Lewis, who was rushed to Turkey Creek Medical Center, where he had surgery and is now on the road to a full recovery.
The school has an AED right outside the gym and Borthwick remembered where it was. The school has an AED right outside the gym and Borthwick remembered where it was.
By JILL MCNEAL
6 News Anchor/Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - A Knoxville fifth grade student is being hailed a hero after his quick thinking helped save a man's life. It happened at First Baptist Concord during a basketball game Tuesday night.

Sebastian Borthwick, 10, actually learned about CPR and AEDs, or automated external defibrillators, in his computer class. The school has an AED right outside the gym and Borthwick remembered where it was.

It was during a church league basketball game that player Charles Lewis, 65, collapsed on the court.

"He was purple and it was really terrifying," said Concord Christian athletics director and former Vols basketball player Rob Murphy.

"We were in the middle of it and Sebastian, who's a fifth grader here kind of piped up and said 'Hey, you want me to go get the AED off the wall?' and I said 'Yeah, absolutely buddy' and he ran and got it," Murphy said

"It's a defibrillator. It shocks the heart if it doesn't find a pulse," Borthwick said.

He learned about the AED in computer class.

"My father had heart issues," said teacher Sherilyn Dawson.

So every Valentine's Day, Dawson teaches her students how to do CPR and use a defibrillator.

"As a teacher I never know if it truly sank in," Dawson said.

But this life-saving lesson did.

"The shock brought me back," said Charles Lewis, who was rushed to Turkey Creek Medical Center, where he had surgery and is now on the road to a full recovery.

"I'm glad I was where I was with the people who were there," Lewis said.
 
That includes Borthwick, who came to visit Lewis in the hospital.

"He looked better there than he did when he was on the floor," Borthwick said. "He asked if I was the one who save his life. I said yes."

Lewis is also grateful to Dawson for teaching more than just computers.

"She just takes it upon herself to get these kids ready to save my life. That's cool," Lewis said.

Lewis wasn't even supposed to be at the church Tuesday night. He and one of the adults who did CPR were both filling in for other players. Lewis calls that divine intervention.
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