WWE wrestler Kane helps hold a free workshop about concussions f

WWE wrestler Kane helps hold a free workshop about concussions for the community

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“I don't think we take them as seriously as we should because we are such a hyper-competitive society, especially when it comes to sports,” said Jacobs. “I don't think we take them as seriously as we should because we are such a hyper-competitive society, especially when it comes to sports,” said Jacobs.
Glenn Jacobs, also known as "Kane," says it's important that parents, students and coaches understand the signs and symptoms of a concussion and what to do to help keep the athletes safe. Glenn Jacobs, also known as "Kane," says it's important that parents, students and coaches understand the signs and symptoms of a concussion and what to do to help keep the athletes safe.
“We need to be very cognizant of identifying these injuries and once they are identified and diagnosed, then making sure an appropriate amount of time is taken for the brain to rest and heal up before returning to sport,” said Dr. Amman. “We need to be very cognizant of identifying these injuries and once they are identified and diagnosed, then making sure an appropriate amount of time is taken for the brain to rest and heal up before returning to sport,” said Dr. Amman.
By STEPHANIE BEECKEN
6 News Reporter

KNOXVILLE (WATE) - World Wrestling Entertainment's Kane was in town Monday, but this time he was not in the ring but rather in the community raising awareness about the dangers of concussions.

Glenn Jacobs, also known as "Kane," says it's important that parents, students and coaches understand the signs and symptoms of a concussion and what to do to help keep the athletes safe.

Organizers say this is the first of many workshops Jacobs hopes to hold across the country in an effort to keep student athletes safe. 6 News asked Jacobs and the WWE's senior physician what people need to know to recognize and treat a concussion.

Drinnen Hayes is a father of five kids who are all active in sports. They play everything from soccer to T-ball. He brought his children to Halls Middle School to meet professional wrestler Kane and learn about concussions from the WWE's ringside physician.

“We are big WWE fans as well so we figured to learn a little about the concussion deal. I think it’s pretty important to know being a sports dad,” said Hayes.

Kane wanted to hold a concussion event for coaches, parents and student athletes to raise awareness about the dangers of concussions.

“I don't think we take them as seriously as we should because we are such a hyper-competitive society, especially when it comes to sports,” said Jacobs.

During the workshop, senior WWE ringside physician Dr. Chris Amann explained the signs and symptoms of a concussion.

“Headaches, dizziness, slowness of thought, changes in personality,” said Dr. Amann

Dr. Amann says there are many symptoms of a concussion, ranging from fatigue to confusion to nervousness.

“We need to be very cognizant of identifying these injuries and once they are identified and diagnosed, then making sure an appropriate amount of time is taken for the brain to rest and heal up before returning to sport,” said Dr. Amman.

He says over the past six years the WWE has evolved with the new research even changing their moves in the ring to protect the wrestlers.

“The blows to the head in terms of chairs or other objects, we have eliminated that because of the potential risk of concussions and injuries to the brain,” said Dr. Amann.

Parents like Drinnen Hayes appreciate the free event to inform the community about concussions.

“I think it’s important to let them know about the concussion deal because they are dangerous,” said Hayes.

Dr. Amann says the long term effects of not resting after a concussion can be having learning disabilities, to experiencing problems with depression or sleeping. He says the long term effects are still a topic of controversy and are currently being studied. He also says if a person has hit their head and is experiencing any physical, cognitive or emotional changes they should be checked out by someone with experience in treating and evaluating concussions. They also stress not to ignore the signs and symptoms.

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