Dandridge soldier first to get foreclosure help through expanded

Dandridge soldier first to get foreclosure help through expanded program

Posted:
After nine months in Afghanistan, Sgt. Jorge Diaz was diagnosed with PTSD. He came home to Dandridge, to his wife and son, but things didn't get much better. After nine months in Afghanistan, Sgt. Jorge Diaz was diagnosed with PTSD. He came home to Dandridge, to his wife and son, but things didn't get much better.
Sgt. Diaz bought his family's first home two and a half years ago, when he and his wife both had jobs. The problems started about a year ago, when she lost hers. Sgt. Diaz bought his family's first home two and a half years ago, when he and his wife both had jobs. The problems started about a year ago, when she lost hers.
By JILL MCNEAL
6 News Anchor/Reporter

DANDRIDGE (WATE) - A local soldier is the first to save his home from foreclosure under an expanded state program. The money comes from the National Mortgage Settlement, a lawsuit against banks that didn't help enough people modify or refinance their loans during the recession.

After nine months in Afghanistan, Sgt. Jorge Diaz was diagnosed with PTSD. He came home to Dandridge, to his wife and son, but things didn't get much better.

Sgt. Diaz bought his family's first home two and a half years ago, when he and his wife both had jobs. The problems started about a year ago, when she lost hers.

"We went through our savings at first trying to keep up. After that we had some family help us out, try to keep us afloat. We tried as long as we could to no avail. We just kept on sinking," Sgt. Diaz said.

Then he learned about the state program Keep My Tennessee Home. It's been helping people avoid foreclosure for more than three years.
But now the program has been expanded to help military members like Sgt. Diaz, whose foreclosure date was already set.

"These folks go abroad to protect us. The least we can do is protect them when they come back home," said Larry Harrington, chief policy deputy for the Tennessee Office of the Attorney General.

The Clinch-Powell Resource Conservation and Development Council, a local HUD-approved non-profit, walked Sgt. Diaz through the process.

"We were able to stop the foreclosure, get him assistance up to $40,000 or 36 months of assistance," said lead counselor Susan Eribarne.

State officials drove in from Nashville Thursday, wanting to spread the word.

"This is one of those programs that really sounds too good to be true. You're in trouble we're going to catch you up and we're going to pay your mortgage for a period of time while you get back on your feet," said Ralph Perrey, executive director of the Tennessee Housing Development Agency.

Sgt. Diaz says he's proof the program can be a life-saver.

"It's done more things than just save my house. It's saved my marriage because we're not fighting as much any more because of our bills. I'm able to support my son a lot more," Sgt. Diaz said.

Powered by WorldNow

1306 N. Broadway NE Knoxville,
Tennessee 37917

Telephone: 865.637.NEWS(6397)
Fax: 865.525.4091
Email: newsroom@wate.com

Can’t find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Young Broadcasting of Knoxville, Inc. A Media General Company.