People march through Knoxville for Civil Rights Act anniversary

People march through Knoxville for Civil Rights Act anniversary

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President Lyndon B. Johnson addressed the nation 50 years ago Wednesday after signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964. President Lyndon B. Johnson addressed the nation 50 years ago Wednesday after signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
More than one hundred people, each with their own message for change, took to the streets of downtown Knoxville Wednesday night. More than one hundred people, each with their own message for change, took to the streets of downtown Knoxville Wednesday night.
“It means a lot to be able to reflect on how far we have come, as a people, and to look into our future to see how far we need to go,” said Dan Brown, Knoxville’s former mayor. “It means a lot to be able to reflect on how far we have come, as a people, and to look into our future to see how far we need to go,” said Dan Brown, Knoxville’s former mayor.
“The Constitution begins with we the people,” said Rabbi Dresner. “Not we the Wall Streeters or we the whatever, the billionaires.” “The Constitution begins with we the people,” said Rabbi Dresner. “Not we the Wall Streeters or we the whatever, the billionaires.”
KNOXVILLE (WATE) – President Lyndon B. Johnson addressed the nation 50 years ago Wednesday after signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The act made it illegal to discriminate against anyone based on who they are, what they look like, what they believe, or where they’re from.

Some of the people who helped get us where we are today came to Knoxville to share the message that more work needs to be done.

The theme of the 50th anniversary march was unfinished business.

“Civil rights is never static,” said volunteer David Twiggs. “You always have to keep working on it and that’s what this march is about.”

More than one hundred people, each with their own message for change, took to the streets of downtown Knoxville Wednesday night.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was an important symbol in the march.

“It means a lot to be able to reflect on how far we have come, as a people, and to look into our future to see how far we need to go,” said Dan Brown, Knoxville’s former mayor.

The first rabbi arrested in the freedom struggle in 1961 and a friend of Dr. King came to Knoxville to share this day.

Rabbi Israel Dresner, now 85 years old, is still strong in his belief that the world can be a better place for all.

“The constitution begins with we the people,” said Rabbi Dresner. “Not we the Wall Streeters or we the whatever, the billionaires.”

The march ended at Mount Olive Baptist Church with messages in word and song, looking toward the future.

Dr. Dorie Ladner was part of the civil rights anniversary celebration in Knoxville. She was arrested in 1962 for trying to be served at a Woolworth’s lunch counter.

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